On Their Own Terms: Science in China, 1550-1900

By Benjamin A. Elman | Go to book overview

Appendix 7
Science Compendia Published
in China from 1877 to 1903
1876–1877, 1881–1882, 1890–1892: Gezhi huibian(The Chinese Scientific Magazine; also called The Chinese Scientific and Industrial Magazine). In the 1890s the first four volumes were reprinted as full sets. In 1901–1902 the past issues of the journal were reorganized topically and edited under the title Collectanea of Science (Gezhi congshu) by Xu Jianyin and reprinted in Shanghai.
1886: Chouren zhuan sunburn (Biographies of mathematical astronomers, third edition); adds 128 Qing entries, compiled by Zhu Kebao (1845–1903). Chouren zhuan sibian (fourth edition), 1898: adds 40 Qing entries, compiled by Huang Zhongjun. Included an appendix for 284 Chinese and 157 Westerners.
1888: Huangchao jingshi wen xubian (Sequel to the collection of Qing dynasty writings on statecraft), edited by Gc Shijun. Shanghai: Tushu jicheng shu.
1889: Zhongxi suanxue dacheng (Great anthology of Chinese and Western mathematics). Compiled by Liu Sheng’an. Shanghai: Tongwen shuju.
1898: Zhongxi wenjian lu xuanbian (Selections from The Peking Magazine). Edited by William Martin. Four vol. Beijing, 1877. Followed by the Wenjian lu xinbian (New edition of The Peking Magazine). Beijing.
1889: Xixue dacheng (Great anthology of Western learning), compiled by Wang Tao. Shanghai: Datong shuju, 1888. Reprint, Shanghai: Cuiwen tang shufang. In eludes many new editions of works originally produced by the Jiangnan Arsenal Translation Department. Followed by Xu xixue dacheng (Continuation), published in Shanghai: Feihong ge shuju, 1897, which also included many earlier Jiangnan Arsenal publications. A reprint, edited by Wang Xiqing and Lu Tiqing, appeared in Shanghai: Zuiliu tang, 1895.
1890: Xixue jicun (Edited depository of Western learning), compiled by Wang Tao. Shanghai: Songyin lu. Contains translations of early scientific texts by Alexander Wylie and Wang Tao.
In addition, the works below became available after 1893 and were sources for students preparing for the civil examinations and schooling based on the “New Government” (Xinzheng) education reforms from 1901–04.
1896: Xixue qimeng (Primers for Western learning). Shanghai: Zhuyi tang. Reprint of Edkins, GZQM (1886). Parts included in Shanghai: Tushu jicheng, 1898.

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