Empirical Musicology: Aims, Methods, Prospects

By Eric Clarke; Nicholas Cook | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

Eric Clarke, Professor of Music at the University of Sheffield, has published on the psychology of performance, the study of rhythm, and musical meaning. Recent publications have focused on motion in music, artificial modeling of expressive performance, meaning in pop music by Pulp, Frank Zappa, and P. J. Harvey, and the relationship between music, psychology, and cultural studies. He was Chair of the Society for Research in Psychology of Music and Music Education from 1994 to 2000 and is on the editorial boards of Psychology of Music, Music Perception, Musicae Scientiae, and Music Analysis.

Nicholas Cook, Professor of Music at Royal Holloway, University of London, has published journal articles on a wide range of musical topics from aesthetics and analysis to psychology and pop. A Fellow of the British Academy and former Editor of the Journal of the Royal Musical Association, his books include A Guide to Musical Analysis; Music, Imagination, and Culture; Beethoven: Symphony No. 9; Analysis through Composition; Analysing Musical Multimedia; and Music: A Very Short Introduction. He is Director of the AHRB Research Centre for the History and Analysis of Musical Recordings (CHARM).

Jane W. Davidson, Reader in Music at the University of Sheffield, completed M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Music at City University while working as an opera singer. After jobs at Keele University and City University, she took up her current post at Sheffield in 1995, where she lectures and researches on psychological issues related to performance. She has published very widely on this and other topics, and was Editor of the journal Psychology of Music from 1997 to 2001. She maintains an active career in performance and direction, working on projects from opera to dance, and completed an M.A. in Contemporary Dance Choreography in 2002.

Tia DeNora teaches Sociology at the University of Exeter, and has special interests in music sociology. Her books are: Beethoven and the Construction of Genius (1995); Music and Everyday Life (2000); and After Adorno: Rethinking Music Sociology (2003).

Philippe Depalle received a Ph.D. degree in Acoustics from the Université du Maine, Le Mans. He was an assistant professor from 1985 to 1988 at the École Supérieure d’Électricité, and a researcher in the Analysis/Synthesis team at the Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique/Musique (IRCAM) from 1984 to 1997. He was visiting professor at the Université de Montréal from 1997 to 1999, and since 1999 he has been Associate Professor in the Faculty of Music at McGill University, Montréal, where he chaired the Music Technology Area from 1999 to 2002. His research interests are related to the modeling, synthesis, analysis, and processing of sound signals for musical applications.

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