Comrades at Odds: The United States and India, 1947-1964

By Andrew J. Rotter | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Acknowledgments should be more than lists, if for no other reason than that everyone reads them first. The danger is that if I wax lyrical about all the help I’ve had, about all the extraordinary ways in which friends, relatives, colleagues, and students have contributed to this project, this section will go on far longer than it should. So, quite out of character, I will economize, with apologies to those who deserve more fulsome thanks.

I begin with those who have helped me at libraries and archives in the United States, Great Britain, and India. The staffs at the National Archives in Washington and the Washington National Records Center in Suitland, Maryland, were courteous and professional. At the Truman, Eisenhower, and Kennedy presidential libraries, I was received with a spirit of generosity and a willingness to help that still takes my breath away. Librarians at Yale, Columbia, and Syracuse University libraries, and the Bancroft, Doe, and South and Southeast Asian libraries at the University of CaliforniaBerkeley, provided me with access to vital manuscript collections and oneof-a-kind sources that clarified my thinking about culture and Indo-U.S. relations; thanks especially to Ken Logan at Berkeley. At my home library at Colgate, Ellen Bolland, David Hughes, and Emily Hutton hunted down sources with awe-inspiring resolve and cheerfulness, making my problems theirs, and solving most of them. In London, I had good help from archivists at the India Office Library, and in Kew the staff of the Public

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