Roots of Musicality: Music Therapy and Personal Development

By Daniel Perret | Go to book overview

Conclusion

In this book I have presented evidence to show that our musicality, the quality of our musical expression, is nothing other than a true reflection of our deepest inner self, of our psycho-energetic being. A person’s musicality is his or her audible fingerprint. The qualitative observation required to detect this is helped by using metaphorically the five elements earth, water, fire, air and space. While reminding us of the five principles composing our universe, each element also appears in a great variety of forms in nature as well as within each one of us. Each detail observed leads us to a deeper understanding of who we are, of what life is.

Through working on musical expression we change. Through undergoing deep personal change our music changes. I have endeavoured to set out some guidelines here so that the various connections and associations involved in all this can be better understood. However, I must remind the reader that any system serves only as a stepping stone. Using the five elements system does not in itself offer simplistic answers, rather it gives us the opportunity to launch out into the unknown. This approach opens up our feeling side, our intuition, it is a doorway giving access to energy and the imperceptible, which is the true home of sound. It is an approach designed to respect the richness and magic in each being because it invites us to recognise the value of having two hemispheres in our brain, two sides within us. Accordingly, the inner and the outer, logic and intuition, material and spirit, feeling and expression, human beings and the planet and its elements may all be reconciled using this approach.

Recognising the quality of an element inside us helps us to respect it within us, in others and in nature. Music is the playground for experiencing it, playing around with it. The word ‘harmony’ is again filled with meaning in music as in life. It is hoped that this helps to reveal other

-153-

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Roots of Musicality: Music Therapy and Personal Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword Finding New Energy for Life in Music Shared 7
  • Introduction 16
  • Rhythm of Life (Excerpt) 25
  • Chapter 1- The Psycho-Energetic Approach to Music 26
  • Tonglen Painting 49
  • Chapter 2- The Five Elements in Music 50
  • The Earth’s Breath 87
  • Chapter 3- Neuro-Musical Thresholds 88
  • Snake Dance (Excerpt) 137
  • Chapter 4- Teacher, Musician, Therapist or Shaman? 138
  • Conclusion 153
  • Appendix 1- Musical Instruments 155
  • Appendix 2- qualitative Research 163
  • Appendix 3- Exercise for Centring Oneself 167
  • Appendix 4- Geneviève Haag’s Assessment Scheme for Autistic Children 169
  • Appendix 5- Levels of Experience 171
  • Appendix 6- Music Therapy Evaluation Chart 173
  • Appendix 7- Improvisation Techniques in Music Therapy 177
  • References 183
  • About the Author 185
  • Subject Index 187
  • Author Index 191
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