Roots of Musicality: Music Therapy and Personal Development

By Daniel Perret | Go to book overview

Appendix 7
Improvisation Techniques in Music Therapy

* Asterisks denote material added by Daniel Perret.

Techniques of empathy
ImitationEchoing or reproducing a client’s response, after the response has been completed
SynchronisationDoing what the client is doing at the same time
IncorporatingUsing a musical motif or behaviour of the client as a theme for one’s own improvising or composing, and elaborating it
PacingMatching the client’s energy level (i.e., intensity and speed)
ReflectingMatching the moods, attitudes, and feelings exhibited by the client
ExaggeratingBringing out something that is distinctive or unique about the client’s response or behaviour by amplifying it
Sounding presence*Cover/observe the client without his/her awareness and watch peripherally, while we continue to play or hum a non-directive music, as if only playing for ourselves
Active listening*Listening and once in a while describing verbally the client’s music
Humour*Exaggerate an element of the client’s play or place it in another context, in order to make the client laugh, in order to help him feel more at ease and confident
Structuring techniques
Rhythmic groundingKeeping a basic beat or providing a rhythmic foundation for the client’s improvisation
Tonal centringProviding a tonal centre, scale, or harmonic ground as a base for the client’s improvision (*e.g. 3 repeating chords, see also pentatonic scales)
ShapingHelping the client define the length of a phrase and give it an expressive shape
Concentrate*Help client to concentrate better on an instrument, to balance dispersion and loss of concentration (strengthen element earth)
Ritual*Introduce beginning and ending rituals, to further feeling of security

-177-

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Roots of Musicality: Music Therapy and Personal Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword Finding New Energy for Life in Music Shared 7
  • Introduction 16
  • Rhythm of Life (Excerpt) 25
  • Chapter 1- The Psycho-Energetic Approach to Music 26
  • Tonglen Painting 49
  • Chapter 2- The Five Elements in Music 50
  • The Earth’s Breath 87
  • Chapter 3- Neuro-Musical Thresholds 88
  • Snake Dance (Excerpt) 137
  • Chapter 4- Teacher, Musician, Therapist or Shaman? 138
  • Conclusion 153
  • Appendix 1- Musical Instruments 155
  • Appendix 2- qualitative Research 163
  • Appendix 3- Exercise for Centring Oneself 167
  • Appendix 4- Geneviève Haag’s Assessment Scheme for Autistic Children 169
  • Appendix 5- Levels of Experience 171
  • Appendix 6- Music Therapy Evaluation Chart 173
  • Appendix 7- Improvisation Techniques in Music Therapy 177
  • References 183
  • About the Author 185
  • Subject Index 187
  • Author Index 191
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