Bees in America: How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation

By Tammy Horn | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Abramson, Charles. “Charles Henry Turner: Contributions of a Forgotten African American to Honey Bee Research.” American Bee Journal 143, no. 8 (2003): 643–44.

Adams, John. The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States. Vol. 10. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856.

Africans in America: America’s Journey through Slavery. Dir. Orlando Bagwell. Alexandria, Va.: Public Broadcasting Service, 1998.

Allen, William Francis, Charles Pickard Ware, and Lucy McKim Garrison. Slave Songs of the United States. New York: Peter Smith, 1867.

“Almonds: A Nutrition and Health Perspective.” Modesto, Calif.: Almond Board of California, 2003.

Amerman, Helen Adams. “Quilting Bee in New Amsterdam.” De Halve Maen 53, no. 4 (1978): 5–6, 21.

Aten, F. L. “The Past and Present of Progressive Beekeeping.” Texas Department of Agriculture Bulletin 22 (Nov.-Dec. 1911): 353.

Avedon, Richard. In the American West. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1985.

Avery, Giles. B. “A Journal concerning Bees in the Second Order.” Unpublished journal. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Mass., 1851–54.

Bagster, S. The Management of Bees. London: Saunders and Outley, 1838.

Bailey, Rosalie Fellows. Pre-Revolutionary Dutch Houses and Families in Northern New Jersey and Southern New York. New York: Dover, 1968.

Baldwin, Ruth Marie. 100 Nineteenth Century Rhyming Alphabets in English. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1972.

Banner, Lois. American Beauty. New York: Knopf, 1983.

Barry, John M. Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How It Changed America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997.

Beck, Bodog F. “Christ with a Hive and Bees.” American Bee Journal 80, no. 12 (1940): 543 and 546.

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Bees in America: How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part One- Hiving off from Europe 1
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter 1- Bees and New World Colonialism 19
  • Part Two- Establishing a New Colony 39
  • Chapter 2- Bees and the Revolution 41
  • Part Three- Swarming West during the Nineteenth Century 63
  • Chapter 3- Before Bee Space 1801–1860 65
  • Chapter 4- After Bee Space 1860–1900 101
  • Part Four- Requeening a Global Hive 143
  • Chapter 5- Early Twentieth Century Industrialization, 1901–1949 145
  • Chapter 6- Late Twentieth Century - Globalization, 1950–2000 199
  • Epilogue 251
  • Notes 263
  • Glossary 293
  • Dramatis Personae 297
  • Bibliography 301
  • Permissions 317
  • Index 319
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