Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture

By Timothy M. Dale; Joseph J. Foy | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The editors are indebted to the kind support of Anne Dean Watkins and all the good people of the University Press of Kentucky. Your support and guidance on this project are enormously appreciated. We could not ask for a better group of people to work with. We would also like to thank the contributors to and reviewers of this volume for their conscientious efforts and insights.

Joseph J. Foy would like to thank Kristi, Connor, and Dr. Sue and Jim Foy for their unending patience and loving assistance. (Kristi, I promise to let you watch some of your shows now.) Thanks also to Dean A. Kowalski for his help in starting the best research program anyone could ask for; Margaret Hankenson and Dick Flannery for their mentoring and rolemodeling; Timothy Dunn, Greg Ahrenhoerster, Phil Zweifel, Chris Roland, Patrick Schmitt, and David Weber for all the pop culture discussions; Bill Schneider for all the anti–pop culture discussions; Scott Silet and the fine staff of the University of Wisconsin–Waukesha library; David Hunt for his comments and insights; Joy Cardin and the good folks of Wisconsin Public Radio for helping to bring academic research to the public conversation in Wisconsin; and Adam Liter for giving me hope that the next generation really does “get it.”

Timothy M. Dale would like to thank Amy for putting up with a husband who watches too much TV; his daughter, Ellia, for enjoying football and political talk shows as much as he does; his parents, Carlynn, Mike, Carol, and Doug, for never subscribing to cable television while he was growing up; Ryan for so many years of putting up with his lectures; Fred Dallmayr for countless hours of patient mentoring; his colleagues in the Department of Social Change and Development at the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay for providing a spirited and supportive academic environment in which to teach and research; and anyone who ever fought to have episodes of television shows available for free on the Internet.

This book is dedicated to Connor Joseph Foy and Ellia Danielle Dale. We love you both very much. Don’t sit so close to the TV.

-xi-

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