Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture

By Timothy M. Dale; Joseph J. Foy | Go to book overview

12
HIP-HOP AND REPRESENTIN’:
Power, Voice, and Identity

Tanji Gilliam

In the introduction to Black Popular Culture, Gina Dent states the following: “Black Americans in the United States now have unprecedented access to cultural and economic capital.… We must therefore begin to analyze the relative power derived from our position as citizens, however unsatisfied, of these United States.”1 Here, Dent indirectly acknowledges that both the hip-hop and the film industries have renegotiated the status of blacks in American society. Blacks have entered these industries in increasing numbers as artists and executives, and blacks frequently inform the “subjects” of music and video projects. Furthermore, Dent introduces the notion of “power” and calls for an investigation of the various manifestations of power that oral and visual media have granted blacks in our postfilm era. She continues, “This means thinking through the hall of mirrors in which our cultural power gets projected as political power.”2

It is important to question the lack of distinction made by the American public between cultural presence (the actual amount of time blacks spend on TV and film screens) and political presence in formal government and other significant alternative political arenas. However, I would argue that the hall of mirrors Dent refers to isn’t the distorted reflection of conflated cultural and political representations alone. Hip-hop can be pervasive and political. However, the blanket generalization that all hip-hop is political is problematic. It is not necessarily wrong but troubling, because this declaration is often made without a concrete consideration of how hip-hop’s politics manifests. It is my contention that hip-hop does not exist at either pole of

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 307

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.