Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture

By Timothy M. Dale; Joseph J. Foy | Go to book overview

14
IT’S NOT FUNNY ’CAUSE IT’S TRUE:
The Mainstream Media’s Response to Media Satire
in the Bush Years

Carl Bergetz

At the start of the new millennium, a phenomenon began troubling members of the mainstream national news media (imprecisely but efficiently shortened here to MSM).1 They were becoming increasingly defensive about their ratings, image, and standing in the community inside and outside the Upper East Side. A perception existed—mainly among the MSM—that the MSM was under attack.

Of course, the MSM had been assailed before and lived to report on it. The confrontations have typically come from technological changes, manifested in competing alternative media outlets.2 From print to radio to television to cable, the old guard has substantially subsumed each new threat into the protean MSM agglomeration. Even the wild World Wide Web, teeming with bloggers living in their moms’ basements and writing in their pajamas, has not been immune, as the MSM has copied, co-opted, or otherwise moved erstwhile indie writers out of their parents’ homes and into some classier sleepwear.3

But during the Bush years, a different threat to the MSM emerged that needed no technological advancement. It was something truly no-tech, something as old as the Romans, something powerful enough to shake the very idea of the MSM itself: clowns. Yes, clowns were breaching the MSM gates. At least that was a conclusion drawn from a 2004 Pew Research Center study on viewing habits, which showed a growing number of people getting their news from clowns (more precisely, “satirists”) on Saturday Night Live, The Daily Show, and similar after-hours comedy programs.4

-257-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 307

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.