Homer Simpson Marches on Washington: Dissent through American Popular Culture

By Timothy M. Dale; Joseph J. Foy | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

CARL BERGETZ is adjunct professor at John Marshall Law School.

PAUL A. CANTOR is the Clifton Waller Barrett professor of English at the University of Virginia. His Gilligan Unbound: Pop Culture in the Age of Globalization was chosen by the Los Angeles Times as one of the best nonfiction books of 2001. He has written widely on pop culture, including essays on The Simpsons, South Park, Star Trek, 24, the western, and film noir.

PETER CASTER is assistant professor of English at the University of South Carolina Upstate. He is the author of Prisons, Race, and Masculinity in Twentieth-Century U.S. Literature and Film as well as articles published in English Language Notes, The Drama Review, and other journals. He is currently coediting the collection Black Masculinity in U.S. History and Literature, 1790–1945.

TIMOTHY M. DALE is assistant professor of political science in the Department of Social Change and Development at the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay. His research interests are in the fields of political theory and American politics, with a particular focus on civic engagement, diversity, and democratic theory. He is coauthor of the book Political Thinking, Political Theory, and Civil Society.

JOSEPH J. FOY is assistant professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin–Waukesha. He is editor of and contributing author to Homer Simpson Goes to Washington: American Politics through Popular Culture, which was selected for the John G. Cawelti Award for the Best Textbook/Primer on Popular and American Culture for 2008 by the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association. Foy also contributed essays on the ethics and rationality of counterterrorism in Steven Spielberg and Philosophy and on power and the transvaluation of ethical standards in The Philosophy of the X-Files.

TANJI GILLIAM is postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and the artistic director of Oil House Productions.

PHILLIP W. GRAY is lecturer in the American Studies Programme at the University

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