Race and Liberty in America: The Essential Reader

By Jonathan Bean | Go to book overview

Praise for Race and Liberty in America

Race and Liberty in America is the race and civil rights anthology we have been waiting for. In our politicized age we often think of civil rights as a movement of racial pride and identity. But Martin Luther King’s movement succeeded precisely because it used the principles of classical liberalism to shatter the idea that race or identity could be a source of entitlement…This book is a timely and necessary corrective.”

—Shelby Steele, author, The Content of Our Character: A New Vision of Race in America

“Readers will find a wealth of information in Bean’s outstanding book Race and Liberty in America, a collection of primary source materials covering the great historical debates over race and ethnicity in America. Students, educators, civic leaders, and general readers can all greatly benefit from the book.”

—Carol M. Swain, Professor of Political Science and Law, Vanderbilt University; author, Black Faces, Black Interests

“If you are interested in the real history of the civil rights movement in America—the radical ideas that set it in motion no matter where they came from— get ready for an intellectual thrill ride. There is no time for political posturing here. Race and Liberty in America is full of revelations and stunning in its honesty.”

—Juan Williams, Senior Correspondent, National Public Radio; author, Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years, 1954–1965 and Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary

“A wonderful collection of fascinating documents…Race and Liberty in America deserves a wide audience and will enrich the reader’s understanding of the nation’s most difficult and troubling domestic issue.”

—Stephan Thernstrom, Winthrop Research Professor of History, Harvard University; coauthor, America in Black and White

Race and Liberty in America is indeed essential reading. All too often classical liberals are attacked for their indifference or insensitivity on matters of race. This superb collection of material dispels that illusion.”

—Richard A. Epstein, James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law, University of Chicago

-i-

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