Race and Liberty in America: The Essential Reader

By Jonathan Bean | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THIS BOOK RESULTED from the collective support of many individuals. My family deserves the greatest acknowledgment for tolerating the endless clicking of the keyboard. David Theroux, founder and president of the Independent Institute (www.independent.org), first saw the work’s importance to the cause of liberty, and has been enormously supportive. His Independent Institute has produced some of the most provocative works on liberty in recent years. The Social Philosophy and Policy Center generously gave me the time to research and write without distraction, with the assistance of Jonathan Miles and John Milliken. Thank you, Fred, Jeff, and Ellen. Robert Weems, David Beito, Paul Moreno, Alex Tabarrok, Ken Masugi, and several anonymous referees read drafts of the manuscript and offered excellent advice on improving it. My research assistant, Colleen Lindsay, was diligent in ferreting out obscure sources. Gerhard Peters maintains a splendid online archive from which I drew several documents, The American Presidency Project (http://americanpresidency.org or http://www .presidency.ucsb.edu/). I recommend it to anyone studying U.S. history. Branch B. Rickey III and Justice George Nicholson helped me learn more about the role of religion in Branch Rickey’s life. Steven Greenhut and others at Freedom Newspapers retrieved hard-to-get articles. Similar thanks go to Matthew Schaefer of the Herbert Hoover Library for giving me access to a series of documents related to desegregation of the Commerce Department. Irwin Gellman cheered me on with his encouraging phone calls. We have never met in person, but I owe him a firm handshake of gratitude. Led by Steve Wrinn, the staff members at University Press of Kentucky are a joy to work with: professional, enthusiastic, and constructive. I

-xxi-

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