Sister States, Enemy States: The Civil War in Kentucky and Tennessee

By Kent T. Dollar; Larry H. Whiteaker et al. | Go to book overview

The Vortex of Secession
West Tennesseans and the Rush to War

Derek W. Frisby

Meredith P. Gentry, like many Tennesseans of the antebellum era, “had always loved the Union” and never believed in secession as “a remedy for any evil, real or imagined.” Indeed, prior to 1860, the state had been instrumental in quashing the idea of secession and its intellectual cousin, nullification. Andrew Jackson’s victory at New Orleans with his Tennessee Volunteers had stifled the resolutions of the Hartford Convention in 1815 and ushered in a wave of nationalism. Jackson’s resolve, bolstered by Tennesseans’ enthusiastic support, had also cowed the nullifiers of South Carolina in 1831–1832. In 1850, when Fire-Eaters from the Lower South infected Tennessee and advocated secession during the Nashville Convention of 1850, Tennessee moderates took control of the convention and diffused the crisis.

Yet, within the course of a few months in 1860–1861, secessionists overturned Tennesseans’ strong Unionist traditions and carried the state into the Confederacy and civil war. The secessionist tide was so swift, according to Gentry, that resistance was futile. Although secession was “contrary to his feelings,” Gentry’s “friends, neighbors, and kinsmen, all rushed pell-mell aboard” the secessionists’ “d——d old worm-eaten, rickety, stem-wheel boat” against his warnings. Suddenly, he looked around and found himself “alone on the bank of the stream, and they were pulling the gang plank. I shouted to the captain: ‘Hold on! Hold on!’ I’ll get aboard too and we’ll all go to hell together.”1

-46-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sister States, Enemy States: The Civil War in Kentucky and Tennessee
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.