Southern Farmers and Their Stories: Memory and Meaning in Oral History

By Melissa Walker | Go to book overview

Bibliographic Essay

Historian Jacquelyn Dowd Hall has recently reminded us that stories matter, whether those stories are told by historians, by politicians, or by people. She says that stories “shape how we see our world. ‘Facts’ must be interpreted, and those interpretations—narrated by powerful storytellers, portrayed in public events, acted upon in laws and policies and court decisions, and grounded in institutions—become primary sources of human action” (see “The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past,” Journal of American History 91 (2005): 1233–63, quote on 1239). In another work, Hall has challenged historians to find new ways of writing about the past, ways of writing that can both examine the gaps between history and memory and break down the barriers between the two (Hall, “‘You Must Remember This’: Autobiography as Social Critique,” Journal of American History 85 (1998): 439–65, quote on 441).

This book has been one attempt to break down those barriers between history and memory. As a result, this study is rooted in the scholarly conversation on the relationships between history and memory, scholarship drawn from a variety of disciplines. To explore the shape of rural southerners’ memories of agricultural transformation, I initially turned to scholarship that examines expressions of collective memory—the shared understanding and articulation of a particular group’s past. Scholars have put forward a range of theories about how collective memory is produced. The earliest theories about the origins of collective memory were drawn from the work of Italian political theorist Antonio Gramsci. Gramsci argued that collective memory was a product of cultural hegemony—that people in power “write” history and that they write it in ways calculated to reinforce and maintain their own power. According to this view, collective memory is imposed from on high, and individuals express collective memory in terms acceptable to people in power, remaining silent about conflicting memories of past events. See Gramsci, Selections from the Prison Notebooks (New York: International Publishers, 1971). Another theory was developed by French sociologist Maurice Halbwachs who argued that collective memory is socially constructed. Individuals remember, but they do so in a specific group context, drawing on that context to recreate the past. In his view, social groups form their own distinct memories, memories shaped by class, gender, ethnic or racial position, education, and generational experi-

-305-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Southern Farmers and Their Stories: Memory and Meaning in Oral History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Directions in Southern History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Three Southern Farmers Tell Their Stories 37
  • Chapter Two - Rural Southerners and the Community of Memory 77
  • Chapter Three - Memory and the Nature of Transformation 117
  • Chapter Four - Memory and the Meaning of Change 139
  • Chapter Five - The Present Shapes Stories about the Past 177
  • Conclusion 223
  • Appendix One - Demographic Data 231
  • Appendix Two - List of Interviewees 237
  • Appendix Three - Interviews 255
  • Notes 281
  • Bibliographic Essay 305
  • Index 319
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.