Taking the Town: Collegiate and Community Culture in the Bluegrass, 1880-1917

By Kolan Thomas Morelock | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
CAMPUS PROMINENCE
Collegiate Literary Societies in
Nineteenth- Century Lexington

Fast learning the ways of gentlemen, … Chad was making himself
known…. He was elected to the Periclean Society, and astonished
his fellow-members with a fiery denunciation of the men who
banished Napoleon to St. Helena—so fiery was it, indeed, that his
opponents themselves began to wonder how that crime had come to
pass.

—John Fox Jr., The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come, 1903

On the morning of Friday, 3 April 1896, attorney Joseph Tanner might well have paused by the window of his office in the Northern Bank Building on Short Street to look down Cheapside, toward Main Street, where a growing crowd of youthful collegiate revelers paraded up and down the city’s thoroughfares, shouting college yells as they went. Perhaps Tanner, remembering his own college days, heard them chanting the yell of his alma mater, Kentucky University: “Hoo Gah Hah! Hoo Gah Hah! K.U. K.U.! Rah! Rah! Rah!” The Lexington Daily Leader reported that the city was “full of college boys” and of delegations of their well-wishers from throughout central Kentucky, gathered for the ninth annual intercollegiate oratorical contest to be held that evening at the Lexington Opera House on Broadway. In this contest, orators from each of the participating colleges would compete for a golden, bejeweled medal described by the Daily Leader as “a specimen of beauty and artistic design.” At the conclusion of that evening’s oratorical contest, the spectacle spilled back onto the streets and became a boisterous parade as the winner was “taken up and carried in triumph on the shoulders of his companions to the Phoenix Hotel” through a throng of students and townspeople.1

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Taking the Town: Collegiate and Community Culture in the Bluegrass, 1880-1917
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 422

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.