The Enemy in Our Hands: America's Treatment of Enemy Prisoners of War, from the Revolution to the War on Terror

By Robert C. Doyle | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

No book is written alone. I thank Dr. Stanley Weintraub, professor emeritus, Pennsylvania State University, for his constant mentoring from ideas to three books; Dr. Arnold Krammer at Texas A&M University, perhaps the most prolific and respected scholar of World War II enemy prisoners of war (EPWs) in the United States, who extended unparalleled friendship and assistance; Lieutenant Colonel Grant Weller at the U.S. Air Force Academy for his assistance in the field of prisoner of war (POW) history; Dr. Stuart Rochester, deputy historian at the Office of the Secretary of Defense, for his help with Vietnam EPWs; Markus Spiecker of Essen, Germany, my former student at the Englisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms Universität, Münster, Germany, for his help with former German POWs; Dr. Michel Cieutat, my former colleague and close friend in the Département d’Etudes Anglaises et Nord-Américaines, Université Strasbourg, France, and Dr. Peter Bischoff, formerly of the Westfälische Wilhelms Universität, both of whom reminded me not to forget the POWs in American hands; and Dr. Cynthia Falk, SUNY Oneonta, for her expert help with Quaker prisoners during the American Revolution. Special gratitude is extended to several former Naval Intelligence liaison officers—Larry Serra, Tim Corcoran, and Peter Decker—and to Robert Senior, Blaise Hogan, and Barry Wallace, who served faithfully in Vietnam with the army, navy, and marines and responded to my queries about how they dealt with EPWs; my former student Kelly Hackett and Dr. Geoffrey Megargee, who told their personal stories about 9/11 in New York City and Washington, D.C.; Stephanie Adams, the Reverend Pablo Mijone, Robert Burns, Brian Moffet, Jason Miller, and Bridget Hogan for research assistance; my friend William F. Henri of Houston, Texas, for editorial help when I needed it the most; Dr. Henry Fitzpatrick for help in photo acquisition; and most important, William Jakub, Linda Franklin, Kathleen Donohue, Loretta Gossett, and all the staff of the John Paul II Library at the Franciscan University of Steubenville. I also thank my

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