The Enemy in Our Hands: America's Treatment of Enemy Prisoners of War, from the Revolution to the War on Terror

By Robert C. Doyle | Go to book overview

TWELVE
Prisoners at War
Forced Repatriation and the
Prison Revolts in Korea

To force those people to go back to a life of terror and persecution
is something that would violate every moral standard by which
America lives.

—Dwight D. Eisenhower

The American military services recognized that political conscience was more important in the Cold War than it had been during World War II. A middle ground was essential because a political act or statement in a prison camp is radically different from an individual political act at home. Prisoners do not represent themselves; they act as direct representatives of their government and the military services engaged in public war. After the Korean War, the American government decided that something had to be done so that its free-thinking soldiers, accustomed to the rule of law, could better understand what was expected of them (see appendix 12). The lessons gained from Korean captivity in general implied that future hostilities in the Cold War would involve strong political issues for soldiers to come to terms with, from capture to repatriation.

International law changed slightly when the 1949 Geneva Convention replaced the 1929 version, but more significantly for the time, political captivity replaced traditional notions of military captivity. As Allied POWs discovered in Asia during World War II, international law meant very little when captors developed other agendas. They never needed a code before; they had the 1929 Geneva Convention, which required all prisoners of war to give only their name, rank, and serial number. There was a second, unwritten code as well, one built into their individual and collective personalities. The American soldier-escapees of the Civil War had called this code “pure cussedness,” which required POWs to cause as much trouble for their captors as possible.1 The United Nations Command in Korea learned that the quality of “pure cussedness” was present not only in American and Allied armies but also among the enemy—in this case, the North Korean and Chinese communist armies.

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Enemy in Our Hands: America's Treatment of Enemy Prisoners of War, from the Revolution to the War on Terror
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 469

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.