The Enemy in Our Hands: America's Treatment of Enemy Prisoners of War, from the Revolution to the War on Terror

By Robert C. Doyle | Go to book overview

Appendixes

APPENDIX ONE
Loyalist Units Organized in the American Revolution

Loyal New Englanders

New York Volunteers

New York Rangers

New Jersey Volunteers

New York Highlanders

Pennsylvania Loyalists

Maryland Loyalists

South Carolina Loyalists

South Carolina Volunteers

Georgia Light Dragoons

Georgia Loyalists

Loyal Virginia Regiment

Westchester Refugees

Buck’s County Dragoons

General Wentworth’s Volunteers

King’s American Regiment

King’s Orange Rangers

Prince of Wales Regiment

General Delancy’s Brigade

Volunteers of Ireland

British Legion

Royal Fensible Americans

Skinner’s Volunteers

Rogers’ Rangers


APPENDIX TWO
Cartel for the Exchange of POWS in the War of 1812

The Provisional agreement for the exchange of naval prisoners of war, made and concluded at Halifax in the province of Nova Scotia on the 28th day of November 1812 between the Honourable Richard John Uniacke His Britannic Majestys attorney and advocate General for the province of Nova Scotia and William Miller Esquire Lieutenant in the Royal navy and agent for Prisoners of War at Halifax; and John Mitchell Esquire late consul of the united states at St Jago de Cuba, american agent for Prisoners of war at Halifax, having been transmitted to the Department of state of the United States for approval and John Mason Esquire Commissary General for Prisoners for the United States having been duely authorised to meet Thomas Barclay Esquire his Britanic Majestys agent for Prisoners of war and for carrying on an exchange of Prisoners for the purpose of considering and revising the said provisional agreement and the articles of the said agreement having been by them considered and discussed—it has been agreed by the said Thomas Barclay and John Mason

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