The Enemy in Our Hands: America's Treatment of Enemy Prisoners of War, from the Revolution to the War on Terror

By Robert C. Doyle | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface

1. Interview with Carl Nash, November 1990, transcribed by Lois Seitz and Robert C. Doyle, May 1991.

2. Captain Giles R. Norrington, USN (Ret.), foreword in Robert C. Doyle, Voices from Captivity: Interpreting the American POW Narrative (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1994), ix.

3. Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., The Disuniting of America: Reflections on a Multicultural Society (New York: Norton, 1992), 45.

4. “Narrative of Marie LeRoy and Barbara Leininger,” Pennsylvania German Society Proceedings 15 (1906): 113. See also Robert C. Doyle, A Prisoner’s Duty: Great Escapes in U.S. Military History (Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1997), 20–21.

5. Narrative of Robert Blakeney, Needham, Massachusetts, transcribed by Robert C. Doyle, 19 May 1993. Blakeney received the Silver Star, Air Medal, POW Medal, three Combat Stars, Good Conduct Medal, Victory Medal, and Presidential Unit Citation.

6. Personal correspondence from Markus Spiecker, 24 November 1998.


Introduction

1. J. Glen Gray, The Warriors: Reflections on Men in Battle (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1959), 132.

2. See John Dower, War without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War (New York: Pantheon, 1986).

3. Gray, Warriors, 135.

4. Ibid., 139.

5. Marcus Cunliffe, George Washington: Man and Monument (New York: New American Library, 1982), 154–55.

6. The literature of dispossession is extensive. See Richard Slotkin, Regeneration through Violence: The Mythology of the American Frontier, 1600–1860 (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1973). See also Wilbur R. Jacobs, Dispossessing the American Indian: Indians and Whites on the Colonial Frontier (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985).

7. Henry R. Luce, “The American Century,” Life, February 17, 1941.


Chapter One. Prisoners of Independence

1. Washington to Howe, in The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745–1799, 25 vols., ed. John C. Fitzpatrick (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1932–1938), 6:101.

-371-

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