The Marxist and the Movies: A Biography of Paul Jarrico

By Larry Ceplair | Go to book overview

7
Salt of the Earth, 1952–54

At last… a real story, about real people.

—Paul Jarrico, 1954

In late August 1950, just before Adrian Scott went to prison, he, Jarrico, and Charles Katz formed a partnership to produce independent films. They had two projects in mind. One was an adaptation of Haywood Patterson’s memoir Scottsboro Boy (cowritten by Earl Conrad);1 the other was an adaptation of a novel about the Iranian crisis of 1946 (The Diplomat by James Aldridge). Jarrico had contracted with Mason Roberson to begin adapting Scottsboro Boy, but Scott, on his trip to Washington for sentencing, became interested in another project concerning blacks in the South: Deep Are the Roots, a play by Arnaud d’Usseau and James Gow.2 Scott thought that it would be an easier project to make into a film than Scottsboro Boy because it had a smaller cast, fewer crowd scenes, and “a hotcha and daring [interracial] romance.” But Jarrico replied that they had already invested too much time and money in the Scottsboro project and that they lacked the resources to do both. In a letter to Katz, Scott expressed a further concern, about Roberson’s writing skills. Scott wrote, “I suppose the principle involved here—Mason’s understanding would far outreach anything that Paul or I could bring but understanding is not enough. We need something good, the first time, for a minimum—without being accused of being sweatshop operators.” Jarrico defended Roberson as a fine writer who had not been able to get a screenwriting job because of his color. Further,

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Marxist and the Movies: A Biography of Paul Jarrico
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Part 1- Screenwriting 1
  • 1- The Early Years 1915–36 3
  • 2- Screenwriting and Communism, 1936–39 25
  • 3- World War II, 1939–45 45
  • Part 2- Blacklist 81
  • 4- The Cold War in Hollywood, 1945–47 83
  • 5- The Interregnum, 1948–50 101
  • 6- The Blacklist Expands, 1951–52 117
  • 7- Salt of the Earth, 1952–54 137
  • 8- The Black Market and Khrushchev’s Speech, 1954–58 159
  • Part 3- Emigration 175
  • 9- Europe, 1958–75 177
  • 10- Political Battles, 1958–75 201
  • Part 4- Home Again 219
  • 11- Back in the USA, 1975–97 221
  • Epilogue 237
  • Filmography 243
  • Notes 255
  • Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.