Aspects of Local Government in a Sumbawan Village

By Peter R. Goethals | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
RARAK: A VILLAGE IN UPLAND WESTERN
SUMBAWA

(1) The seasonal subsistence round

The main settlement at Rarak contains some sixty weathered wooden houses enclosed by broken sections of a low stick fence. In Malay style the dwellings stand on pilings about five feet above the ground; in typically Sumbawan fashion they are closely clustered within the village clearing. Located on a sloping ridge in western Sumbawa’s northern foothills, this clearing lies nine miles beyond the rim of irrigated rice land encircling the lowland town. From Rarak’s adjacent tract of tilted upland the villagers have traditionally drawn their entire subsistence. For this they depend almost exclusively upon the shifting cultivation of dry rice, a crop which they harvest from slopes ranging up to a thousand feet in altitude. Traditionally the basis of the entire village economy, this system of slash and burn, or swidden, agriculture today supports a community population of well over four hundred people.

Radiating from Rarak’s central settlement are innumerable footpaths which link the village to settlements in every direction. Along several such paths — but usually no more than half a mile from the central village — are scattered the half dozen small fenced settlements locally used as gardens. Each settlement contains a cluster of dwellings and rice storehouses and actually makes up a small homestead (keban) where individual families of Rarak live permanently to cultivate fruit trees, sugar cane, or root crops. Although removed from the spatial center of community life these “homesteaders” not only till their rice fields within the Rarak territory, but they are regarded as complete members of the community. Their membership is at once apparent in that each of their

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aspects of Local Government in a Sumbawan Village
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 5
  • Preface 9
  • Introduction 11
  • Acknowledgements 13
  • Chapter One- Sumbawa- An Orientation 15
  • Chapter Two- Rarak- A Village in Upland Western Sumbawa 49
  • Chapter Three- Authority and Community at Rarak 65
  • Chapter Four- Authority and the Citizen- Cases 117
  • Chapter Five 137
  • Bibliography 159
  • Glossary 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 180

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.