Resistance in an Amazonian Community: Huaorani Organizing against the Global Economy

By Lawrence Ziegler-Otero | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

In 1990 the Huaorani people of eastern Ecuador formed the Organización de las Nacionalidades Indígenas de la Amazonia Ecuatoriana or ONHAE. The group of young, Spanish-literate men who initiated this step wanted an organization that could speak for the Huaorani in dealings with the multinational oil companies, missionaries, and state agencies that were increasingly threatening Huaorani territory and autonomy. In founding a nongovernmental organization (NGO), the Huaorani were emulating the organizational processes of the Shuar (Jívaro), Quichua, and Siona-Secoya groups, and joining with them in provincial, regional, and national confederations. This represented a dramatic step outside of Huaorani cultural practices and necessitated the adoption of notions of contract, government, democracy, and hierarchical power prevalent in western capitalist societies.

The organization thus formed has found itself positioned among and within a plethora of competing interests, powers, and ideologies. Missionaries, oil companies, environmentalists, and other indigenous organizations have all tried to co-opt, manipulate, or silence ONHAE. The organization’s leaders have been accused of corruption, threatened, condemned as “communists,” and beguiled with gifts and attention designed to influence them. They have signed agreements with the Ecuadorian state and the oil companies, in apparent contradiction of their organizational positions and public statements.

Notes for this section can be found on page 24.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Resistance in an Amazonian Community: Huaorani Organizing against the Global Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - History and Background 25
  • Chapter 2 - Onhae 75
  • Chapter 3 - Practice and Praxis 105
  • Chapter 4 - Toward an Organizational Evaluation 142
  • Chapter 5 - Conclusion 157
  • Works Cited 166
  • Index 174
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 176

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.