Resistance in an Amazonian Community: Huaorani Organizing against the Global Economy

By Lawrence Ziegler-Otero | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
CONCLUSION

Anthropology has a historic relationship with indigenous peoples. It remains the preeminent discipline in which the problems, cultures, and achievements of the “small peoples” (Lee 2000) are studied, compared, and theorized. Despite the general shift from the study of the peoples of the periphery to those of the metropolitan nations, many anthropologists continue their work with indigenous peoples. But there has been an important change in these projects, as Lee (2000: 3-4) has stated:

While many if not most Anthros [sic] have moved into the cities and
settled there, others continue to work in the jungles of Central Amer-
ica, the highlands of Peru, and plains of East Africa. But here the
ground has shifted as well. It was one thing to work in these places
when the subjects were non-literate and politically disenfranchised.
But how do we approach peoples in the year 2000 who are politically
articulate and who in pressing their claims hold press-conferences,
hire lawyers, and operate web sites?

As discussed also by Nugent (1993: 230-37), the study of indigenous peoples can no longer take the form of the study of an individual “tribal” group. Such studies are misleading and essentializing, and ignore the articulation of cultures, economies, and systems of production. The present work represents an effort to replace indigenous peoples as an important subject for anthropological inquiry. In critically examining the struggles of indigenous

-157-

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Resistance in an Amazonian Community: Huaorani Organizing against the Global Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - History and Background 25
  • Chapter 2 - Onhae 75
  • Chapter 3 - Practice and Praxis 105
  • Chapter 4 - Toward an Organizational Evaluation 142
  • Chapter 5 - Conclusion 157
  • Works Cited 166
  • Index 174
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