8

“I got you a job!” she announced as she pushed through the front door holding bags of groceries in her arms. I was reclining on the living room floor with my hands clasped, cradling the back of my head which was comfortably supported by a pillow. My attention was still focused on the action from the television as my mother headed into the kitchen.

I casually replied, “I’m not looking for a job. I’m only tenyears old.”

“Don’t get smart with me, boy,” she shot back as she plopped her load on the table. “You’ll be working all day this Saturday. And Sunday after church if you’re not finished by Saturday.”

My interest was dissipating from the drama on the television as Moe was about to poke his fingers into Curly’s eyes and yank a clump of Larry’s hair out of his head. “Ohhh, a wise guy, eh?” Curly shrieked as Larry let out a painful “yyyyaaaaahhhh!” “Okay, now spread out, you muttonheads. We gotta find that tomb of King Ruten Tuten,” Moe ordered. His harsh, bossy voice was overwhelmed by my mother’s explanation of the impending job duties.

I sat up and painfully listened as my mother began to put the groceries away. “You’re going to work for Paul; he owns the P Market. He has five acres, and he wants somebody to pull the weeds. You know the land across the street from the graveyards? Well, you’re going to work there.”

“Why are there two cemeteries here anyway?” I asked, shifting the subject. “This town isn’t even that big.”

“Never mind about that!” she ordered. “You get to let one of your friends help you, and it won’t be that Eddie Brown. He’s too travieso. And not Jesús Colmenares either; he just likes to play baseball. Alberto Balderas is going with you.

-29-

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A Fabricated Mexican
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • 1 7
  • 2 10
  • 3 16
  • 4 17
  • 5 19
  • 6 23
  • 7 27
  • 8 29
  • 9 31
  • 10 33
  • 11 37
  • 12 40
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  • 17 54
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  • 22 70
  • 23 79
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  • 25 89
  • 26 97
  • 27 102
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  • 30 114
  • 31 123
  • 32 126
  • 33 130
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