19

I could not believe my eyes. I looked closely and attempted to shake the confusion from my mind. But my eyes relayed the same bizarre picture to me that had stirred my initial shock. They were stuck together. I mean really stuck together. It was Eddie Brown’s little mutt, Blackie, and my wienie dog, Mickey. I had never seen such a sight in all of my thirteen years of living.

“Mom!” I yelled as I ran into the house screaming. “Mickey and Blackie are stuck together. I think they’re hurt.”

My mother dropped what she was doing and ran outside. With the movement of a devoted fireman, she grabbed the hose and turned the water on full blast. She aimed the gushing water at the point of contact maintained by the two dogs, and one of them yelped as the connection was broken.

“What happened?” I asked as my mother turned off the hose. “How come they were stuck like that?”

“Never mind!” she snapped. “Get ready for school.”

My eighth-grade science teacher was the person whose image flashed into my mind, years later, when I discovered the word curmudgeon. Mrs. Graf was seldom friendly and always taught with strict authority. “Mr. Coronado, please stop tapping your pencil,” she would order me when my light drumming became annoying. I nevertheless decided to ask her what had happened with Mickey and Blackie, since my mother would not explain and my sister cryptically revealed that someday I would know.

“And they were stuck together at the rear ends,” I said to Mrs. Graf as I concluded what seemed to me to be a genuine scientific inquiry. Class had not quite started, and I took this opportunity to be individually enlightened. Somehow I knew, and I didn’t know. I suspected I should have known more than I already did, but I barely knew enough not to embarrass myself. For instance, when the other boys laughed and

-60-

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A Fabricated Mexican
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • 1 7
  • 2 10
  • 3 16
  • 4 17
  • 5 19
  • 6 23
  • 7 27
  • 8 29
  • 9 31
  • 10 33
  • 11 37
  • 12 40
  • 13 42
  • 14 46
  • 15 49
  • 16 51
  • 17 54
  • 18 57
  • 19 60
  • 20 64
  • 21 67
  • 22 70
  • 23 79
  • 24 82
  • 25 89
  • 26 97
  • 27 102
  • 28 106
  • 29 108
  • 30 114
  • 31 123
  • 32 126
  • 33 130
  • 34 133
  • 35 140
  • 36 147
  • 37 153
  • 38 159
  • 39 164
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