The Big Banana

By Roberto Quesada; Walter Krochmal | Go to book overview

29

Javier came back from Boston. He was surprised to find his apartment crammed full of books. Eduardo told him about Andrea, explaining that the books were property of some of his and Casagrande’s friends. Now he had to return them. Fortunately, he’d been lucid enough to keep detailed records of who owned what. Anxious and desperate, Javier barely heard the story about Andrea and the intellectual sexploit.

“Do you have any money?” he asked Eduardo.

“Not a lot.”

“Thirty?”

“Yes,” and Eduardo pulled it out of his wallet and handed it to him.

“Will you come with me?”

Eduardo agreed without hesitation; he was smart enough to know what was up. Javier put on a coat; Eduardo put on his. They got to the train station. They took the 1 to 59th Street and changed to the C, which they took all the way to 125th. Night was falling. The atmosphere felt strange to Eduardo. When they got out on the street they came face to face with the grime, with the car carcasses stripped of even the smallest parts.

“This is Harlem,” Javier said to him, “watch out. It’s dangerous.”

They walked a few blocks. Javier looked from side to side, carefully checking out every passerby. They came to a corner and stopped.

“Wait for me here,” Javier said to him. “This is a Dominican restaurant—it’s very cheap. Give me fifteen minutes and I’ll be back; if I’m not, take the train and head out.”

-148-

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The Big Banana
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • 1 1
  • 2 5
  • 3 9
  • 4 13
  • 5 18
  • 6 21
  • 7 27
  • 8 30
  • 9 34
  • 10 37
  • 11 42
  • 12 47
  • 13 56
  • 14 67
  • 15 71
  • 16 80
  • 17 88
  • 18 93
  • 19 95
  • 20 102
  • 21 107
  • 22 110
  • 23 119
  • 24 127
  • 25 130
  • 26 136
  • 27 140
  • 28 143
  • 29 148
  • 30 152
  • 31 155
  • 32 160
  • 33 163
  • 34 166
  • 35 176
  • 36 179
  • 37 183
  • 38 188
  • 39 199
  • 40 202
  • 41 206
  • 42 211
  • 43 217
  • 44 220
  • 45 225
  • 46 229
  • 47 237
  • 48 241
  • 49 245
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