The Power of Survey Design: A User's Guide for Managing Surveys, Interpreting Results, and Influencing Respondents

By Giuseppe Iarossi | Go to book overview

Foreword

The vast majority of data used for economic research, analysis, and policy design comes from surveys—surveys of households, firms, schools, hospitals, and market participants. In today’s world it is easy to go online and download all kinds of data—infant mortality rates, trends in inflation, poverty levels, degree of inequality, growth rates of investment and GDP. Most users of these data do not think very much about where they come from. But they should. Take what seems a fairly straightforward piece of information, such as the amount of gross investment in China in 2004: the real answer to this question is all of the expenditure or effort households, firms, and the government made during the year to increase or enhance the value of the land, buildings, and machinery that can be used to produce goods and services. It would be extraordinarily costly—probably impossible—to actually count all this activity. So, in practice researchers, officials, and market participants will rely on an estimate that is derived from surveys of households and firms. The accuracy of the estimate will depend on how well the survey is done.

This innovative book is both a “how-to” about carrying out highquality surveys, especially in the challenging environment of developing countries; and a “user’s guide” for anyone who uses statistical data for any purpose. Reading this book will provide users of data with a wealth of insight into what kinds of problems or biases to look for in different data sources, based on the underlying survey approaches that were used to generate the data. In that sense the book is an invaluable “skeptic’s guide to data.”

For the producer of data through surveys, Giuseppe Iarossi has written a straightforward, practical guide to survey design and implementation. This guide is based on his years of experience implementing surveys of firms in a variety of institutional settings in Africa, East Asia, and South Asia. It is a readable guide that covers such issues as writing questionnaires, training enumerators, testing different wordings of questions, sample selection, data entry, and data cleaning.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Power of Survey Design: A User's Guide for Managing Surveys, Interpreting Results, and Influencing Respondents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 265

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.