A Theology of the Cross: The Death of Jesus in the Pauline Letters

By Charles B. Cousar | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
Jesus’ Death and God

In an age like ours, obsessed with the issue of historical and scientific causation, a natural question to raise initially about the crucifixion of Christ is: Who did it and for what reason? Was Jesus’ death precipitated by Jews, who took offense at his persisting relationship with tax collectors and sinners, his apparent carelessness in observing the sacred law of Moses, or perhaps his statement about the destruction of the temple at Jerusalem? Or since Jesus was killed by crucifixion, could the Romans have been the culprits? Could Jesus have been a closet revolutionary representing a more serious threat to law and order than otherwise appears on the surface? Or could there be a sense in which Jesus was responsible for his own death? Could he have been so resolutely and recklessly obedient to his cause that he painted himself into a corner, leaving the powers that be no alternative but to kill him? Like many martyrs before and since, could he have felt that his mission was better served by death than by continued life?

It is astonishing what we discover when we put these questions to the Pauline texts. Paul appears totally uninterested in tracking down and identifying the villains responsible for Jesus’ crucifixion, nor does he offer any historical reasons why they did it. To be sure, one passage speaks of “the Jews, who killed both the Lord Jesus and the prophets” (1 Thess. 2:14-15), but the problematics of the text prevent its being identified as Paul’s answer to the

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Theology of the Cross: The Death of Jesus in the Pauline Letters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Overtures to Biblical Theology ii
  • A Theology of the Cross - The Death of Jesus in the Pauline Letters iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor’s Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Jesus’ Death and God 25
  • Chapter 2 - Jesus’ Deathand Human Sinfulness 52
  • Chapter 3 - Jesus’ Death and Resurrection 88
  • Chapter 4 - Jesus’ Death and the People of God 109
  • Chapter 5 - Jesus’ Death and the Christian Life 135
  • Conclusion 176
  • Indexes 190
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 199

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.