War Stories

War is the extension of prose by other means.

War is never having to say you’re sorry.

War is the logical outcome of moral certainty.

War is conflict resolution for the aesthetically challenged.

War is a slow boat to heaven and an express train to hell.

War is either a failure to communicate or the most direct expression possible.

War is the first resort of scoundrels.

War is the legitimate right of the powerless to resist the violence of the powerful.

War is delusion just as peace is imaginary.

“War is beautiful because it combines the gunfire, the cannonades, the cease-fire, the scents, and the stench of putrefaction into a symphony.”

“War is a thing that decides how it is to be done when it is to be done.”

-149-

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Girly Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Let’s Just Say 1
  • In Particular 3
  • Thank You for Saying Thank You 7
  • Let’s Just Say 10
  • Some of These Daze 15
  • It’s 8:23 in New York 17
  • Today Is the Next Day of the Rest of Your Life 20
  • Aftershock 23
  • Report from Liberty Street 26
  • Letter from New York 31
  • World on Fire 35
  • Didn’t We 37
  • The Folks Who Live on the Hill 39
  • One More for the Road 41
  • In a Restless World like This Is 42
  • Ghost of a Chance 43
  • Choo Choo Ch’Boogie 44
  • Stranger in Paradise 46
  • Broken English 47
  • Lost in Drowned Bliss 49
  • Sunset at Quaquaversal Point 50
  • A Flame in Your Heart 52
  • Warrant 55
  • Warrant 57
  • Fantasy on Nightmare on Elm Street Theme 61
  • He’s So Heavy, He’s My Sokal after Danny Kaye and Milton Schafer 64
  • Why I Don’t Meditate 66
  • Questionnaire 67
  • Language, Truth, and Logic 69
  • From Canti Antichi by Antonio Calvocressi (1538–1574) 72
  • Slap Me Five, Cleo, Mark’s History 73
  • In Parts 81
  • Reading Red 83
  • Pomegranates 91
  • In Parts 96
  • 12- 2 106
  • Photo Opportunity "My Pig Was Asleep on the Doorstep."—Robert Creeley 110
  • Likeness 115
  • Castor Oil for Emma 117
  • Shenandoah for Ben Yarmolinsky 118
  • Jacob’s Ladder for Nam June Paik (1932–2006) 120
  • Don’t Get Me Wrong 121
  • Interim Standoff 123
  • Should We Let Patients Write Down Their Own Dreams? 124
  • Bridges Freeze before Roads 125
  • Pocket in the Hole 126
  • Evening Sail with Prawns 128
  • Secrets of a Clear Hand 129
  • Rain Is Local 131
  • Set Free (Knot) 132
  • If You Lived Here You’d Be Home Now 133
  • The Warble of the Ammonia-Bellied Barkeep 134
  • Comforting Thoughts 137
  • Further Color Notes 139
  • Likeness 140
  • Girly Man 147
  • War Stories 149
  • There’s Beauty in the Sound of the Rushing Brook as It Forks & Bends in the Moonlight 155
  • Sign under Test 157
  • A Poem Is Not a Weapon for/after Tqm Rawqrth 164
  • Emma’s Nursery Rimes 165
  • Wherever Angels Go 167
  • Death Fugue (Echo) after Stefan George 168
  • The Beauty of Useless Things- A Kantian Tale for Susan Stewart 170
  • Self-Help 171
  • The Bricklayer’s Arms 175
  • The Ballad of the Girly Man for Felix 179
  • Notes and Acknowledgments 183
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