The Lost Equilibrium: International Relations in the Post-Soviet Era

By Bettie M. Smolansky; Oles M. Smolansky | Go to book overview

After the Cold War:
Relationships in the Red Sea and
Persian Gulf Regions

STEPHEN PAGE

THE END OF THE COLD WAR AND THE COLLAPSE OF THE USSR HAD A dynamic effect on domestic and international relationships in the Third World. In countries and regions around the globe, the end of the competition between superpowers for friends and influence forced a new awareness and calculation of regional and internal political and security balances, of national interests, and of intrinsic strengths and weaknesses.

The new calculations led to radically different outcomes in different regions, and nowhere was this truer than in the contrast between developments in the Red Sea and Persian Gulf regions after the mid-1980s. In the Red Sea region, it was demonstrated that the Soviet competition for presence and influence in the 1970s and 1980s had had more to do with cold war zero-sum assumptions, worst-case scenarios, ideologically driven quests for Third World allies, and habitual behavior of strategic denial than with actual geopolitical importance. It is not surprising, then, that when the cold war ended, and particularly when the USSR collapsed, Russia lost interest in the region, and (except for humanitarian spasms) its member-states were left to their own devices.

The Persian Gulf countries, by contrast, have not been left to their own devices. Their reserves of oil and their ability to make major purchases of arms and other high-technology commodities have ensured their status as a region of continuing global importance. There was never any question that the United States would continue to see the Gulf in zero-sum terms; and the experience of the 1980s indicated that Washington would expend considerable efforts to defend American interests there. By the end of the 1980s, the USSR was only a marginal player in the region, although it continued to aspire to a role that was more than nominal. After the

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Lost Equilibrium: International Relations in the Post-Soviet Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 393

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.