The Lost Equilibrium: International Relations in the Post-Soviet Era

By Bettie M. Smolansky; Oles M. Smolansky | Go to book overview

Russia and Northeast Asia

CHARLES E. ZIEGLER

RUSSIA AND THE COUNTRIES OF NORTHEAST ASIA ARE EXPERIENCING internal transformations and shifting international alignments that make the future of the Asia-Pacific region highly uncertain. Moscow’s approaches to Northeast Asia have been influenced by domestic political infighting, economic crisis, regional separatism, and the severe deterioration of the military. The Asian economic crisis of 1997–98, North Korea’s continued development of ballistic missile capabilities, China-Taiwan tensions, plans by the United states and its allies to deploy a theater missile defense in the region, Japan’s persistent economic troubles, and the collapse of the suharto regime in indonesia have altered the region’s strategic calculus.

This paper analyzes the impact of the Soviet breakup on the regional power balance in the Asia-Pacific and on Russia’s foreign policy identity; discusses Moscow’s political, economic, and security ties with the major Northeast Asian nations; and makes some general observations on the implications of changes in Asia for Russian and American security interests.

Three themes emerge from this analysis. First, a more nationalist Russia is seeking to reestablish its influence as a respected great power in the Asia-Pacific. This process began under Boris Yeltsin and has been reaffirmed by Vladimir Putin. Russia’s limited economic and military capabilities, and its ongoing political crisis, make it very unlikely that the Russian Federation will acquire the great power status it seeks. second, policies formulated in Moscow toward Northeast Asia are increasingly at odds with eastern Russia’s regional interests and priorities. Russia’s peculiar form of federalism has introduced a new dynamic into regional politics. Third, while the united states and Russia have similar interests in stabilizing the region, the two differ substantially over China, East Asia’s ascendant power. While both have sought a strategic partnership with Beijing, neither has managed to craft a successful long-term China policy.

-168-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Lost Equilibrium: International Relations in the Post-Soviet Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 393

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.