Patricia Neal: An Unquiet Life

By Stephen Michael Shearer | Go to book overview

Appendix
Career

Professional Theater

The Voice of the Turtle, Morosco Theatre, New York, September 1945. Staged by John Van Druten; written by John Van Druten; settings, Stewart Chaney; musical arrangements, Alexander Haas; costumes, Bianca Stroock; presented by Alfred de Liagre Jr. Cast: Martha Scott (Sally Middleton), Alan Baxter (Bill Page), Vicki Cummings (Olive Lashbrooke); Patricia Neal was understudy for the roles of Sally and Olive.

The Voice of the Turtle, Selwyn Theatre, Chicago, September 1945–January 1946. Cast: K. T. Stevens (Sally Middleton), Hugh Marlowe (Bill Page), Vivian Vance (Olive Lashbrooke); Patricia Neal was understudy for the roles of Sally and Olive and replaced Vivian Vance as Olive in Chicago beginning December 31, 1945 for two and one-half weeks.

Bigger than Barnum, Wilbur Theatre, Boston, April 22, 1946. Staged by Edward Clarke Lilly; written and produced by Lee Sands and Fred Rath; settings, H. Gordon Bennett; Miss Williams’s costume by Oberon; Miss Neal’s act-two suit by Florence Lustig; produced by Lee Shubert and J. J. Shubert. Cast: Benny Baker (Perly Drake), Sid Melton (Chuck Jenkins), Jean Mode (Girl Attendant), Oscar Polk (Alex), Patricia Neal (Claire Walker), Chili Williams (Roberta Dixon); “Julius” as himself.

Devil Take a Whittler, Westport Country Playhouse, Westport, Connecticut, July 29, 1946. Staged by Paul Crabtree; written by Weldon Stone; settings, Lawrence Goldwasser; music by Tom Scott; special lyrics by Joy Scott; choreography, John Larson; special costume supervision, Hallye Clogg; costumes, the Theatre Guild and Brooks Costume; managers of The Westport Playhouse, Lawrence Langner, Armina Marshall, and John C. Wilson; managing director, Martin Manulis. Cast: Carol Stone (Myra Thompson), Paul Crabtree (Lem Skaggs), John Conte (The Devil), Patricia Neal (Kat Skaggs), Chuck Palmer and his Rustic Ramblers (themselves).

The Voice of the Turtle, Morosco Theatre, New York, August 1946–September 1946. Cast: Beatrice Pearson (Sally Middleton), John Beal (Bill Page),Vicki Cummings (Olive Lashbrooke); Patricia Neal replaced Vicki Cummings as Olive for two weeks beginning August 12, 1946.

Another Part of the Forest, Fulton Theatre, New York, November 20, 1946. Staged by Lillian Hellman; written by Lillian Hellman; produced by Kermit Bloomgarden; settings by Jo Mielziner; lighting by Jo Mielziner; music by Marc Blitzstein; costumes, Lucinda Ballard; assistant to Miss Ballard, Anna Hill Johnstone; Miss Dunnock’s costumes and all men’s costumes, Eaves Inc.; costumes of Misses Neal, Phillips, and Hagen, Brooks Costume;

-349-

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Patricia Neal: An Unquiet Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • A Note from Kirk Douglas ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part 1 - Actress 1
  • 1 - Beginnings 2
  • 2 - Progress 14
  • 3 - Broadway 28
  • 4 - Stock 40
  • 5 - Warner Brothers 50
  • 6 - Gary Cooper 62
  • 7 - London 74
  • 8 - Hollywood 86
  • 9 - Tinseltown 98
  • 10 - 20th Century-Fox 106
  • 11 - Purgatory 118
  • Part 2 - Survivor 131
  • 12 - New York 132
  • 13 - Roald Dahl 146
  • 14 - Marriage 158
  • 15 - England 170
  • 16 - Career 182
  • 17 - Triumph 192
  • 18 - Tempest 208
  • 19 - Tragedy 226
  • 20 - Stardom 238
  • Part 3 - Legend 251
  • 21 - Illness 252
  • 22 - Comeback 270
  • 23 - Roses 282
  • 24 - Television 300
  • 25 - Independence 312
  • 26 - Divorce 326
  • 27 - Serenity 336
  • Appendix - Career 349
  • Notes 385
  • Selected Bibliography 413
  • Index 419
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