The 9th Infantry Division in Vietnam: Unparalleled and Unequaled

By Ira A. Hunt | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
The General Offensive and
General Uprising

In 1967, the Communists assumed that the RVNAF and Allied Forces were weak and could be defeated so they abandoned their limited offensive tactics and adopted the concept of large battles, generally conducted by main force units. Th us, the Communists changed their tactics from company- and platoon-sized or smaller operations to battles conducted with multibattalion attacks. For example, on 10 December 1967, at An Naut Tan, the 2/60 Infantry was attacked by the 2nd Independent Battalion supported by the 506th Battalion and the 5th Nha Be Battalion. Hanoi subsequently decided to implement the “General Offensive and General Uprising” plan of the war in 1967–1969. Th e offensive was to be conducted throughout South Vietnam in several phases by Viet Cong main force units attacking cities and U.S. and RVNAF military units and installations. The Communists believed that with tactical victories, the people of South Vietnam would rally behind the Communist cause, thus leading to the overthrow of the government, the so-called General Uprising.


First Phase of the VC/NVA General Offensive, Tet

The first phase of the Communist General Offensive was launched on 30 January 1968, when the enemy breached its self-declared Tet holidays cease-fire to launch countrywide, all-out attacks against provincial and district capitols and U.S. and GVN military installations. A significant change in these attacks by the Communists was the use of daylight assaults on their targets to include major cities. Using these tactics, they sustained heavy losses; however, they entrenched themselves in many built-up areas, terrorizing the populace and inflicting widespread damage to property. Obviously, the Viet Cong activities were designed

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