Manhattan: Letters from Prehistory

By Hélène Cixous; Beverly Bie Brahic | Go to book overview

THE EYE-PATCH

Hence the “hidden eye.”

On April 6, 2001, the eye thing flashes back again exactly as I saw it on January 1, 1965. This was in the room on the top floor of the King’s Crown Hotel where I turned up in fear and trembling, almost devoid as I was of hope, sure I’d never make it, the plane in which I’d been holding my life’s breath until it touched down in New York not having touched down in New York but been swept off in the night of a snowstorm until it let itself drop all but broken on Boston. From fogbank to fogbank I descended the floors of hope as the Greyhound bus, I no longer know how I happened to be on it, poked along slow as bad luck, utterly noiselessly and aimlessly wending its way between two cities that were betraying me or that I was betraying between two names.

For now I’m calling this book The Tale. The story that The Tale should tell could be contained in two words: literary madness or more precisely bound up in a single one: literarymadness. The events occupied less than a year but from this

-23-

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Manhattan: Letters from Prehistory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Prologue vii
  • Certes a Sacrifice 1
  • The Eye-Patch 23
  • A Yellow Folder 35
  • I Will Not Write This Book 41
  • The Evidence 53
  • I Loved above All Literature 59
  • The Necropolis 71
  • More and More Notebooks 83
  • I Am Naked 95
  • The Charm of the Malady 103
  • Folly USA 115
  • Donne Is Done 125
  • Room 91 133
  • The Vroom Vroom Period 147
  • Elpenor’s Dream 161
  • After the End 177
  • Translator’s Notes 185
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