The Amistad Revolt: Memory, Slavery, and the Politics of Identity in the United States and Sierra Leone

By Iyunolu Folayan Osagie | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This research was generously supported by grants from the Research and Graduate Studies Office, College of Liberal Arts, and the Minority Faculty Development Office at the Pennsylvania State University.

The helpful comments offered by the University of Georgia Press readers have guided me through the revision of this book. I thank especially Kristine Blakeslee of the University of Georgia Press and Jayne Plymale for their editorial help. I also want to thank my English department colleagues for both professional and personal support. I am grateful for the valuable suggestions on parts of the manuscript received from Bernard Bell, Cary Fraser, and Deborah Clarke. I am indebted to Carla Mulford who read the entire manuscript and offered helpful criticism and advice. Family and friends also offered their unfailing support throughout this project. Let me especially thank my sisters, Octavia, Kashope, Susan, Michele, and Deborah, and my children, Iviose, Osaze, and Ebinose. Finally, I thank my husband Sylvester for his helpful criticism and infinite patience.

I am also deeply grateful to the following people for granting me interviews: Alfred Marder, Ed Hamilton, Charlie Haffner, Raymond Desouza George, and Samuel Pieh. I also thank the staff of the Amistad Research Center at Tulane and the Beneicke Rare Books Library at Yale.

I gratefully acknowlege permission to reprint from the following source: Iyunolu Osagie, “Historical Memory and a New National Consciousness: The Amistad Revolt Revisited in Sierra Leone,” Massachusetts Review 38, no. 1 (Spring 1997): 63–83.

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