The Faiths of the Postwar Presidents: From Truman to Obama

By David L. Holmes | Go to book overview

John F. Kennedy
1917–1963 PRESIDENT FROM 1961 TO 1963

When John Fitzgerald Kennedy was a candidate for president, his religious affiliation made a great deal of difference to many Americans. The question of Kennedy’s Roman Catholicism animated the 1960 election. It provided an analog to such elections as those of 1800 and 1928, when the religions of Thomas Jefferson and Al Smith played a crucial role. In 1960, many Americans voted for or against Kennedy simply because he was a Roman Catholic.

Several years after the election, a journalist named Jim Bishop published a book entitled A Day in the Life of President Kennedy.1 Its cover contained a photograph of President Kennedy, Jackie Kennedy, and their two young children, Caroline and John, standing in front of Joseph Kennedy’s estate in Palm Beach, Florida (which had a chapel), following a private service on Easter Sunday. Since Bishop’s book dealt with a typical weekday in President Kennedy’s life, the inevitable implication was that formal religion and the institutional, worshipping church mattered so much to Kennedy that he regularly attended daily Mass, as his mother, Rose Kennedy, did.

Both of John F. Kennedy’s parents came from affluent and influential Irish American families. Born in Boston in 1890, his mother, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, was the daughter of the colorful Irish American politician John F. “Honey Fitz” Fitzgerald, a three-term congressman and three-term mayor of Boston. His father, Joseph (“Joe”) Patrick Kennedy, came from a similarly well-to-do Boston background. Operating saloons and other businesses, he rose to positions of influence in the Irish American community and in the Democratic Party of Massachusetts.

Conducted in the private chapel of Archbishop William Cardinal O’Connell, the marriage of Joe and Rose in 1914 displayed the status of the Kennedy and Fitzgerald families. Ultimately, the couple had five daughters and four sons, with John F. Kennedy as the second child. Although concerns

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Faiths of the Postwar Presidents: From Truman to Obama
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 397

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.