The Faiths of the Postwar Presidents: From Truman to Obama

By David L. Holmes | Go to book overview

Ronald Wilson Reagan
1911–2004 PRESIDENT FROM 1981 TO 1989

“I see two primary threads jumping out of my father’s storyline,” Ron Reagan wrote in My Father at 100: “[a] fierce desire to be recognized as someone noteworthy, even heroic; and his essentially solitary nature.”

In his recent biography of his father, President Reagan’s youngest son continues:

In the film unwinding in his mind, Dad was always the loner…who rides
to the rescue in reel three….[He] was looking to wear an unblemished
white hat….He wanted and needed acclaim and recognition….[But] it
was crucial to his sense of self that he be seen working on behalf of others,
and not for personal gain.

If the first thread Ron Reagan perceives in his “storyline” relates to public life, the second deals with the private life behind it. “Another, quieter Reagan, just as vital,” the son writes, “rested invisibly beneath the waves.” Calling this second persona “the Private Reagan,” the younger Reagan defines its role in his father’s life:

This hermetic self…was, in effect, the producer and director for the man
on stage….[Inside] the personal drive he publically foreswore burned with
a cold but steady flame. This private self…formed his core….The Ronald
Reagan with whom everyone is familiar could not have existed without the
Ronald Reagan he rarely let anyone see.1

Shortly before he became governor of California in 1967, Ronald “Dutch” Reagan answered a letter from an inquirer who wished to know his religious faith. “I was raised in the Christian Church,” he replied, “which as you know believes in baptism when the individual has made his own decision to accept Jesus. My decision was made in my early teens.”2

Although many historians of Christianity would not classify the Christian

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Faiths of the Postwar Presidents: From Truman to Obama
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 397

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.