We Shall Not Be Moved: The Desegregation of the University of Georgia

By Robert A. Pratt | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
Burying Unhappy Ghosts

For even as the uglier moments are
embedded in my consciousness like
the reality of a snakebite…so too are
the kindnesses, both large and small,
of people, white people especially,
whose humanity triumphed over the
bigotry around them.

—Charlayne Hunter-Gault

As the University of Georgia prepared to celebrate its bicentennial in 1985 university officials decided to seize the opportunity to begin a reconciliation with its first black undergraduate alumni, both of whom by now had distinguished themselves in their chosen careers. Hamilton Holmes had earned a medical degree from Emory University, the first black person to do so, and had a successful orthopedics practice in Atlanta. Charlayne Hunter-Gault had worked as a journalist for the New York Times for ten years before joining PBS’s MacNeil-Lehrer News Hour, where she would work for twenty years as an anchor and news correspondent. Both Holmes and Hunter-Gault still felt some bitterness because of the way they had been treated as students, and though twenty-two years had passed, neither of them had ever been officially welcomed back to the university. Holmes had appeared on campus once, in 1977, after being invited by the Committee on Black Cultural Programming to speak at the university’s annual observance of Martin Luther King’s birthday. In 1983 he became the first black to be appointed to the UGA Foundation Board of Trustees. Hunter-Gault had been back twice—first in 1979 to do a

-153-

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We Shall Not Be Moved: The Desegregation of the University of Georgia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter One - More Than a Matter of Segregation 1
  • Chapter Two - "The Color Is Black" 27
  • Chapter Three - "A Qualified Negro" 48
  • Chapter Four - "Journey to the Horizons" 67
  • Chapter Five - Tolerated, but Not Integrated 111
  • Chapter Six - "Wouldn’t Take Nothing for My Journey Now" 130
  • Epilogue- Burying Unhappy Ghosts 153
  • Notes 161
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 199
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