Revisiting Mary Higgins Clark: A Critical Companion

By Linda De Roche | Go to book overview

8
We’ll Meet Again
(1999)

In her sixteenth best-selling tale of mystery and suspense, We’ll Meet Again, Mary Higgins Clark diverges a bit from her typical formula. Granted, contemporary social issues—in this case, health maintenance organizations (HMOs)—still give focus to certain plot elements and thematic concerns, and the intricately plotted tale hinges as usual on the life-or-death struggle of an endangered heroine.

Heroine, however, becomes heroines in We’ll Meet Again, as Clark offers not one, but rather two central characters, both of whom must face the past to survive the present. The dual focus is an interesting but not entirely successful departure because neither character is fully realized. Molly Carpenter Lasch, the wrongly convicted heroine, would in any other Clark novel possess both the resourcefulness and the determination to save herself from harm. In this novel, however, she never quite triumphs over her victimization. Fran Simmons, the investigative reporter and old school friend who typically would play little more than a supporting role in Molly’s drama, virtually upstages the intended protagonist—but without the proper resolution to her own search for self. In effect, We’ll Meet Again promises more than it delivers, for plot rather than character drives this novel. Clark never entirely resolves the issues of personal growth and character development so clearly evident in the novel, and thus its conclusion is unconvincing and even unsatisfying. Molly and Fran may have

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Revisiting Mary Higgins Clark: A Critical Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Plot of Her Story 1
  • 2 - Writing to Form- Mary Higgins Clark and the Conventions of Suspense 11
  • 3 - Clark the Storyteller 25
  • 4 - Christmas Suspense 37
  • 5 - Moonlight Becomes You (1996) 55
  • 6 - Pretend You Don’t See Her (1997) 69
  • 7 - You Belong to Me (1998) 85
  • 8 - We’Ll Meet Again (1999) 99
  • 9 - Before I Say Good-Bye (2000) 111
  • 10 - On the Street Where You Live (2001) 125
  • 11 - Daddy’s Little Girl (2002) 141
  • Bibliography 157
  • Index 163
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