Governing Delaware: Policy Problems in the First State

By William W. Boyer | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION: THE PEOPLE AND THEIR LAND

1. Randy Fitzgerald, “The Little State That Could—And Did!” Readers Digest 123, no. 740 (December 1983): 185.

2. Michael Barone and Grant Ujiŕusa, The Almanac of American Politics, 1984 (Washington, D.C.: National Journal, 1983), 218.

3. See James Phelan and Robert Pozen, The Company State: Ralph Nader’s Study Group Report on Delaware (New York: Grossman, 1973); Gerald Colby Zilg, Du Pont: Behind the Nylon Curtain (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1974); and Gerald Colby, Du Pont Dynasty (Secaucus, N.J.: Lyle Stuart, 1984). In his introduction to the 1973 book, Nader lamented that something is wrong in the state of DuPont: “That something includes poverty, racism, urban dislocation, discriminatory highway monuments to DuPont’s corporate needs, gross underpayment of income and property taxes by the DuPonts and the other rich, manipulated legislators and public officials, a business-coddling judiciary, a disgraceful state of health and education for all but the well-to-do, and the brooding inhibitions on dissent and diversity of community initiatives which sometimes come from the omnipresent DuPont complex.” Phelan and Pozen, Company State, xi.

4. Quoted by Margo McDonough, Joe Emerson, Judith Pennebaker, and W. Douglas Rainey, Delaware: First Place (Chatsworth, Calif.: Windsor Publications, 1990), 33.

5. Quoted in editorial, Wilmington News Journal, 19 January 1996, A2O.

6. McDonough et al., Delaware: First Place, 33.

7. See Delaware Economic Development Office, 1995 Statistical Overview—Delaware: Smaller, Quicker, Smarter for Business (Dover, Del., March 1995), 1–8 See chapter 3 for examples of Delaware data favorable to business.

8. Delaware Population Consortium, Annual Population Projections, version 1997.0 (Dover, Del.: 30 January 1997); Council of State Governments, The Book of the States, 1992–93 (Lexington, Ky: Council of State Governments, 1992), table 10.3, p. 661; U.S. Bureau of the Census, “Population: State Rankings,” in Statistical Abstract of the United States (Washington, D.C., 1994). In 1790, the first U.S. census determined that Delaware had a population density of 29.8 persons per square mile. By 1890, that number had reached 85. The 1990 Census revealed a density of 340.8 persons per square mile.

9. Gerald F. Vaughn, foreword to Final Report of the Governor’s Select Panel on the Future of Delaware Agriculture (Dover, Del.: Delaware Dept. of Agriculture, 23 December 1988). Delaware’s premier historian, John Munroe, has put the matter this way: “It is an oddity that Delaware has the largest percentage of its land area devoted to urban and suburban living and business of any state. Yet it also still has the largest percentage of its land

-251-

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Governing Delaware: Policy Problems in the First State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Cultural Studies of Delaware and the Eastern Shore 3
  • Title Page 5
  • Contents 9
  • List of Illustrations 11
  • List of Tables 13
  • Preface 15
  • Introduction- the People and Their Land 21
  • Part I- Political Culture 29
  • 1- The Economy 31
  • 2- Parties and Politics 45
  • 3- The Governor as Leader 56
  • Part II- Governance 71
  • 4- State Government 73
  • 5- Local Government 85
  • 6- Nongovernments 100
  • 7- Public Administration 113
  • 8- Public Finance 124
  • Part III- Public Policy Problems 141
  • 9- Land-Use Planning 143
  • 10- The Environment 160
  • 11- Health 175
  • 12- Public Education 190
  • 13- Welfare 207
  • 14- Crime and Justice 222
  • Conclusion 240
  • Appendix An- Action Agenda 243
  • Notes 251
  • Bibliography 314
  • Index 332
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