In Excess: Studies of Saturated Phenomena

By Jean-Luc Marion; Robyn Horner et al. | Go to book overview

TRANSLATOR’S
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The traces of many others are woven throughout this text, including those of John D. Caputo, who persistently and patiently cajoled me to undertake this work, which has indeed become a labor of love; Kevin Hart, mentor and friend, who first introduced me to Jean-Luc Marion; Marion himself, not least because this work is born from his book, but also because he supported and encouraged me in the project; my cotranslator for chapters 1–5, Vincent Berraud, without whose expertise I would have been lost, and who shared a lot of chocolate, cheese, and good Australian red; Jeffrey L. Kosky, whose work with previous versions of chapters 1 and 6 and other Marion texts was a constant and inspiring reference point and who, in making his translation of “In the Name: How to Avoid Speaking of Negative Theology” available electronically, saved me an enormous amount of new work; Thomas A. Carlson, whose translations of Marion were an invaluable resource; my friend and colleague Stephen Curkpatrick, who completed all the transliterations and translations of the Greek, who proofread the text as a whole and made valuable editorial suggestions, and whose understanding of and excitement about the text deepened and reinforced my own; my good friend Peter Howard, who translated the Latin; my colleagues and friends at the Melbourne College of Divinity and Monash University, who made space for this sometimes omnipresent work, and especially Anne Collopy, who was often called upon to locate resources for me, and whose friendship unfolded along with the delights of Marion’s book; my newer colleagues at Australian Catholic University, who were a supportive part of the final stages of preparation; the highly professional team at Fordham University Press; Paul Caputo, who did the artwork; and not least my family and friends—my parents, Damian, Meg, Julie, and Bosco—whose faithfulness overwhelms me, and whose love enables me to fly.

Robyn Horner April 2002

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Excess: Studies of Saturated Phenomena
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Translator’s Acknowledgments vii
  • Translator’s Introduction ix
  • Foreword xxi
  • 1 - Phenomenology of Givenness and First Philosophy 1
  • 2 - The Event or the Happening Phenomenon 30
  • 3 - The Idol or the Radiance of the Painting 54
  • 4 - Flesh or the Givenness of the Self 82
  • 5 - The Icon or the Endless Hermeneutic 104
  • 6 - In the Name- How to Avoid Speaking of It 128
  • Index 163
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.