In Excess: Studies of Saturated Phenomena

By Jean-Luc Marion; Robyn Horner et al. | Go to book overview

5
The Icon or the Endless
Hermeneutic

1. THE VISIBLE IN DEFAULT

The object appears—it transmutes its reduced givenness into visible phenomenality. Consider the most simple case, where we cannot reasonably doubt that it is a complete appearance, or that it delivers an effective object, since we do manage to constitute a given in giving to it a complete and coherent sense. Consider (being inspired by the cube, the favorite example of Husserl himself) this simple box of tobacco (say, Capstan) that I take out of my pocket, perhaps in order to fill my Peterson at the end of this conference. I see it, just the same as it was at the shop of the retailer who sold it to me, and similar to many other ones that are found in many tobacco shops (even on Harvard Square) and no doubt will be for some time to come, if legislation is only toughened up slowly. It is nothing but a rectangular, metallic parallelepiped, blue and gilded, of about sixty grams, measuring ten centimeters by five, and about two centimeters high. I know this, and there would be nothing to add, if, indeed, I ever perceived it truly in this way. But what I perceive of it as lived experiences of consciousness will only ever be three of the six sides. If I want to see the three others, which at the moment I do not in fact see, I would have to turn it over with a movement of my hand, but when I see the three other sides (of course!), the first three will become invisible to me. Therefore I can never, in truth, see this box entirely; I only know it. I constitute it, but always in adding other, non-effective sketches to those that I actually perceive. I associate the apprehension of what presents itself with the apprehension of what does not present itself—I associate effectively given lived experiences with those not effectively given (that have been or will be given, but are not presented at this moment). Therefore, even for a physical body (Körper), and not only for another flesh (Leib), I must have recourse to what Husserl names “… a sort of appresenta-

-104-

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In Excess: Studies of Saturated Phenomena
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Translator’s Acknowledgments vii
  • Translator’s Introduction ix
  • Foreword xxi
  • 1 - Phenomenology of Givenness and First Philosophy 1
  • 2 - The Event or the Happening Phenomenon 30
  • 3 - The Idol or the Radiance of the Painting 54
  • 4 - Flesh or the Givenness of the Self 82
  • 5 - The Icon or the Endless Hermeneutic 104
  • 6 - In the Name- How to Avoid Speaking of It 128
  • Index 163
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