The American Dreams of John B. Prentis, Slave Trader

By Kari J. Winter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
Possessive Relations

March 23, 1707
To the Right Honourable, Right Worshipful, and Worshipful, the
Governours of Christ’s-Hospital, LONDON.

The humble Petition of John Prentis Citizen & Embroderer of
London Humbly sheweth: That the Petitioner hath formerly lived in
very good repute but by great losses in his Trade of a Baker is fallen to
decay and hath the charge of five motherless children the which he is
not able to maintain by his imploy of a Porter without the help of charity

Therefore he humbly beseeches your Worships, in your usual Pity
and Charity to distressed Men, poor Widows, and Fatherless Children,
to grant the Admission of one of his Children into Christ’s-Hospital,
named William Prentis of the age of 8 years, ½ there to be educated and
brought up amongst other poor children.

And He shall ever Pray, etc.

John Prentis
This is to certify to whom it may concern that William Prentis son of
John Prentis by Sarah his wife was born on the 10 Day of October 1699
in St. James Dukes Place London.

Christ’s Hospital in London offered terror, excitement, confusion, education, opportunity, and loneliness to the twelve hundred pupils who lived there at the dawn of the eighteenth century. They were called the Blue Coat Boys after the school’s uniform: long blue gowns, knee breeches, and yellow stockings. The widowed, impoverished father, John Prentis, succeeded in his 1707 petition to gain his son, William, admission to the school, which had been founded by King Edward VI to educate orphans and sons of poor free men in commerce (Gill 15–18). At eight years of age, William Prentis was the median age of boys entering the school.

On holidays, the Blue Coat Boys could stroll down Warwick Lane, opposite Christ’s Hospital, to Ludgate Hill and the grand entrance of the

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Dreams of John B. Prentis, Slave Trader
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Note on the Text xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Possessive Relations 9
  • Chapter 2 - Apprenticeship 49
  • Chapter 3 - Brotherly Collusions 71
  • Chapter 4 - Slave Trading 94
  • Chapter 5 - Family Values 125
  • Chapter 6 - Wills and Possessions 155
  • Chapter 7 - Relic(T)S 173
  • Notes 191
  • Bibliography 193
  • Index 203
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.