Hope and Danger in the New South City: Working-Class Women and Urban Development in Atlanta, 1890-1940

By Georgina Hickey | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

WHEN I STARTED as a graduate student, I would read the acknowledgments in all my course books and wonder why it took people a decade to finish a single book. One husband, one dog, two kids, seven moves, two jobs, and very nearly ten years later, I finally get it. This book began as my dissertation and has traveled significant personal and professional ground with me since then—and I think it is much better for it. I will forever feel a special affinity for and interest in Atlanta because of this long association. Over the course of researching and writing this book, my work has been nurtured by many different communities—Ann Arborites; ballet dancers on the big island of Hawaii; musicians, artists, and old friends in Atlanta; colleagues in Statesboro; and family and friends across the country—and I thank them all for the sorts of contributions that do not wind up in footnotes.

On the professional side, I owe many debts as well. I had the good fortune to be a graduate student at the University of Michigan during the early 1990s, when the place was teeming with scholars who shared and nurtured my particular historical interests. In addition to David Scobey, Earl Lewis, and Carol Karlsen, who served as my dissertation committee, I thank Elsa Barkley Brown, Alice Echols, Susan Johnson, and Robin Kelley for their interest and encouragement. My graduate student cohort was also top-notch, and Robin Bachin, Erik Seeman, and Victoria Wolcott remain generous colleagues and good friends. My colleagues at Georgia Southern University, especially Jonathan Bryant, Peggy Hargis, Annette Laing, and the members of the Social Science Research Network, provided crucial intellectual and moral support during my five years in Statesboro. Returning to the North to take up a position at the University of Michigan—Dearborn during the final stages of revising has provided me with yet another group of incredibly supportive colleagues. Outside of my home institutions, Nan Enstad, Glenda Gilmore, Elna Green, Nancy Hewitt, Sarah Judson, Cliff Kuhn, and Gretchen Maclachan, Clay McShane, Mary Odem, Peggy Pascoe, and especially Susan Cahn offered enormously helpful feedback and support at crucial stages of the revision process.

As a dissertation, this project received financial support from the University of Michigan History Department, Rackham Graduate School, the Mellon Founda-

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hope and Danger in the New South City: Working-Class Women and Urban Development in Atlanta, 1890-1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Rising, Ever Rising 9
  • Chapter Two - Laboring Women, Real and Imagined 25
  • Chapter Three - Public Space and Leisure Time 54
  • Chapter Four - Class, Community, and Welfare 79
  • Chapter Five - Physical and Moral Health 106
  • Chapter Six - Political Alignments and Citizenship Rights 132
  • Chapter Seven - The Transitional Twenties 164
  • Chapter Eight - The Forgotten Man Remembered 190
  • Conclusion 216
  • Notes 221
  • Bibliography 263
  • Index 289
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 297

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.