Hope and Danger in the New South City: Working-Class Women and Urban Development in Atlanta, 1890-1940

By Georgina Hickey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
Public Space and Leisure Time

ACCORDING TO press reports, a black man raped Annie Laurie Poole on a rural road near her home south of Atlanta on the last day of July 1906. In the middle of August, Mrs. Richard Hembree claimed to have fended off a different black man’s aggression using her hat pin. In another rural community outside of the city limits, Ethel and Mabel Lawrence alleged an encounter with a “tall, slender and very black negro,” who beat the young white women severely. Mittie Waits supposedly met a would-be attacker in a wooded area nine miles from Atlanta but scared him off with her screams. Throughout the late summer of 1906, Atlantans read in their local newspapers these stories of white women attacked by African American men. The themes of the tales remained remarkably constant throughout the summer and into the fall: women living outside of the city, women who by virtue of their rural location (and their race) should have been safe, found themselves facing the worst elements of the city: “prowling and idle Negroes,” emboldened by gambling, drink, and drawings of naked white women on liquor bottles, seeking to establish their political equality through the sexual domination of white women.1 Even alleged attacks on white women that occurred closer to the city’s center in August and September happened in spaces that white Georgians imagined to be safe from the disorders of the city, the women’s own homes. While most of the stories were later proved false,2 repeated tales of rape and incendiary cries from the yellow press to “Protect Our Women!” coincided with blatantly racist efforts to close city establishments selling liquor to African Americans and an inflammatory gubernatorial campaign in which African American disfranchisement became a major rallying point for white voters. The furor these three trends created among whites culminated in four days of violent rioting in Atlanta in late September 1906.3 At least twenty-five Atlantans died in the violence, and more than a hundred suffered injuries.

The calls to defend white women from black men and, by implication, from the supposed depravity of the city, left Atlanta’s African American women vulnerable once white mobs began their rampage. Mattie Adams, a black woman who ran a small eatery near downtown, suffered a brutal beating at the hands of the white

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hope and Danger in the New South City: Working-Class Women and Urban Development in Atlanta, 1890-1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Rising, Ever Rising 9
  • Chapter Two - Laboring Women, Real and Imagined 25
  • Chapter Three - Public Space and Leisure Time 54
  • Chapter Four - Class, Community, and Welfare 79
  • Chapter Five - Physical and Moral Health 106
  • Chapter Six - Political Alignments and Citizenship Rights 132
  • Chapter Seven - The Transitional Twenties 164
  • Chapter Eight - The Forgotten Man Remembered 190
  • Conclusion 216
  • Notes 221
  • Bibliography 263
  • Index 289
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 297

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.