Hope and Danger in the New South City: Working-Class Women and Urban Development in Atlanta, 1890-1940

By Georgina Hickey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
Political Alignments
and Citizenship Rights

IN 1918 Mrs. S. A. Christian filed for divorce. During six years of marriage, she, like most married women of the time, had done “all of the cooking and housework” and, in her mind at least, “treated [her husband] as a loving and devoted wife should.” She also helped the family financially, running a boardinghouse and saving enough to open a small grocery store on Decatur Street, Atlanta’s bustling corridor of working-class life. On August 1, 1918, according to Mrs. Christian, her husband flew into a rage and chased her out of the store. She fled to Athens, Georgia, fearing for her physical safety. Later in the month, after her husband had failed to forward to her the proceeds of the store for the time she had been gone, Mrs. Christian asked the Superior Court of Fulton County for a divorce. Her petition accused her husband of treating her in a “cruel and inhumane manner,” although the main issues deviling the couple seem to have been money and power. Mrs. Christian claimed to have “defray[ed] all expenses [such] as rents, taxes, license and purchasing of goods” for the grocery and to have “fully compensated” her husband “for what help he rendered in the store.” She felt entitled to the money made in the store during her absence as well as to any future earnings it might bring, asking the court for alimony for life. She used the divorce law, which provided for divorce on the grounds of “cruel treatment,” to press her demands.1

Mr. Christian, for his part, purported to have “loved his wife and treated her with the tenderness of a child.” He objected to her characterization of him as merely her employee and asserted ownership of the store. Explaining his wife’s claims as an act of fantasy by a “low…grocery man’s wife,” he told the court that she spent too much of her time nurturing “romantic ideas contracted from the perusal of cheap novels.” He relied on the court to affirm his position as breadwinner and to apply complementary gender typing to his wife, whereas she hoped the court would overlook traditional gender roles in marriage, recognize her independent economic achievements, and sanction her labors by providing

-132-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hope and Danger in the New South City: Working-Class Women and Urban Development in Atlanta, 1890-1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Rising, Ever Rising 9
  • Chapter Two - Laboring Women, Real and Imagined 25
  • Chapter Three - Public Space and Leisure Time 54
  • Chapter Four - Class, Community, and Welfare 79
  • Chapter Five - Physical and Moral Health 106
  • Chapter Six - Political Alignments and Citizenship Rights 132
  • Chapter Seven - The Transitional Twenties 164
  • Chapter Eight - The Forgotten Man Remembered 190
  • Conclusion 216
  • Notes 221
  • Bibliography 263
  • Index 289
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 297

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.