Hope and Danger in the New South City: Working-Class Women and Urban Development in Atlanta, 1890-1940

By Georgina Hickey | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Manuscript Sources

Atlanta Chamber of Commerce. Records of the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce.

Atlanta History Center. Atlanta City Council Minutes. Atlanta City Directory (1897–1916, 1918–40). Atlanta Lung Association Papers (ALA). Atlanta Woman’s Club Collection. Jennie Meta Barker Collection. Child Service and Family Counseling Papers (CSFC). Christian Council of Atlanta Collection (CCC). John J. Eagan Collection, 1870–1924. Hillside Cottages Collection. Herbert T. Jenkins Collection. Joseph C. Logan Papers. Kate Richardson Lumpkin Collection. Minutes of Police Commission of Council, Atlanta. Emma V. Paul Scrapbook. Sheltering Arms Day Nursery Collection. Gay Bolling Shepperson Papers. WRFG/Living Atlanta Collection (LAC).

Atlanta University Center, Woodruff Library, Special Collections. Commission on Interracial Cooperation Papers (microfilm) (CIC). Papers of John and Lugenia Burns Hope (microfilm). Neighborhood Union Collection (NU).

Auburn Avenue Research Library, Atlanta. Sweet Auburn Neighborhood: An Oral History Project.

Cornell University, Labor-Management Documentation Center, M. P. Catherwood Library, Ithaca, New York. American Labor Education Service, Southern Summer School for Women Workers (ALES).

Emory University, Robert W. Woodruff Library, Special Collections Department, Atlanta. Mary Cornelia Barker Collection. Raoul Family Collection. Women’s Christian Temperance Union Collection. Comer McDonald Woodward Collection. Young Women’s Christian Association Collection, Atlanta Branch.

Fulton County Superior Court, Atlanta. Records of the Fulton County Civil Division, 1915–38 (FCCD).

Georgia Department of Archives and History, Atlanta. Department of Public Welfare Collection. Grady Hospital Auxiliary Collection. League of Women Voters of Atlanta Records, 1920–63. Jane Van De Vrede, Works Projects Administration Records and Other Papers, 1913–73. Vanishing Georgia Collection. Women’s Suffrage Records, Georgia (1894, 1911–19) (WSGC).

Institute Archives, Georgia Institute of Technology, Price Gilbert Memorial Library, Atlanta. Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills Company Collection (FBCM).

Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Atlanta Branch Papers (NAACP). National Urban League, Atlanta Branch Papers.

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Hope and Danger in the New South City: Working-Class Women and Urban Development in Atlanta, 1890-1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Rising, Ever Rising 9
  • Chapter Two - Laboring Women, Real and Imagined 25
  • Chapter Three - Public Space and Leisure Time 54
  • Chapter Four - Class, Community, and Welfare 79
  • Chapter Five - Physical and Moral Health 106
  • Chapter Six - Political Alignments and Citizenship Rights 132
  • Chapter Seven - The Transitional Twenties 164
  • Chapter Eight - The Forgotten Man Remembered 190
  • Conclusion 216
  • Notes 221
  • Bibliography 263
  • Index 289
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