Fearless Confessions: A Writer's Guide to Memoir

By Sue William Silverman | Go to book overview

Biographical Notes

Lisa D. Chavez has published two books of poetry: Destruction Bay (West End Press) and In an Angry Season (University of Arizona Press), and has been included in such anthologies as Floricanto Si: A Collection of Latina Poetry, The Floating Borderlands: 25 Years of U.S. Hispanic Literature, and American Poetry: The Next Generation. Her creative nonfiction has been published in Fourth Genre, The Clackamas Literary Review, and in various anthologies. She teaches in the creative writing program at the University of New Mexico and lives in the mountains with two unruly Shiba Inus and a German shepherd.

Harrison Candelaria Fletcher’s essays have appeared in The Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction, Fourth Genre, Puerto del Sol, Cimarron Review, Pilgrimage, Open Windows, The Writer’s Chronicle, and other journals. An essay finalist for the National Magazine Award, his recent honors include a Pushcart Prize Special Mention, New Letters Prize for the Essay, New Letters Readers’ Award, and New Millennium Writers honorable mention. An MFA recipient from the Vermont College of Fine Arts, he teaches creative nonfiction at Lighthouse Writers Workshop in Denver, and is also nonfiction editor at upstreet.

Candance L. Greene has an MFA in Creative Nonfiction Writing from Goucher College and has been published in several anthologies and magazines, including Bittersweet: An Anthology of Contemporary Black Women’s Poetry; Southern Breezes: An Anthology of Southern Poets; and the Baltimore Urbanite Magazine. She is a regular contributor to Channel Magazine, Baltimore’s urban lifestyle magazine. She lives in Baltimore with her husband and two sons.

Michael Hemery is a graduate of the MFA program at Vermont College of Fine Arts (VCFA). He received the 2007 Francois Camoin Scholarship for “outstanding work in fiction or creative nonfiction” from the VCFA Scholarship Fund as well as two nominations for the Association of Writers and Writing Programs Intro Journals Award. He resides in Cleveland, Ohio, with his wife, the poet Stacie Leatherman, and teaches English at North Royalton High School. “After the Dash” appears for the first time in Fearless Confessions.

-235-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fearless Confessions: A Writer's Guide to Memoir
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 237

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.