Transforming Scriptures: African American Women Writers and the Bible

By Katherine Clay Bassard | Go to book overview

general index
Abraham cycle, blessing (barak) motif in, 17
Address to Miss Phillis Wheatley (Hammon),55
African American Christians: as covenant people of Bible, 65; preliminary prayer practice of, 53–54; as unfree or underground,35
African Americans and the Bible (Wimbush),2
African American spirituals, 99–100
agency and desire, in Dessa Rose,97
“Agency of the Letter in the Unconscious” (Lacan), 19–20,22
Alchemy (Patricia Williams), 90–91
allegory, 19–22, 28–29, 32–33, 65, 89, 101–2,105
Allen, Richard, “A Prayer for Hope,” 56
Alter, Robert, 2, 9, 40–51,93
AME (African Methodist Episcopal) church, 8, 10–11, 37,56
American Bible, An (Gutjahr), 25–26
American Bible Society (ABS), 37–40
American Christians: and ascriptive Bible reading, 41; and church's dismissal of slaveholder,44
American ideal of family,87
American Missionary Association (AMA),38
American Telescopes (Lawrence), 10
American Tract Society (ATS),38
“America's Bibles” (Stein), 25–27
America's God (Noll), 2, 28–29,31
Andrews, William,11
anti-Semitism, and double-fall concept, 15, 134n12 antislavery poetry, 42–47
Apology for African Methodism (Tanner), 10
Appeal (David Walker), 4, 58, 64,81
Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (James Weldon Johnson), 67, 70
“Balaam and His Master” (Harris), 10
Balaam trope, 6; and African American public hermeneutics, 40–42; black women's use of, 2, 10; context of, 9–10; linked to Song of Songs, 19–22; McMahon's derision of, 10; and Queen of Sheba, 74
barak. See blessing (barak)
beauty, and blackness, 19–20, 73, 102–4
“Before the Feast of Shushan” (Spencer), 72
Begrimed and Black (Hood), 14
Beloved (Morrison), 101–2, 105
Bibb, Henry, 3, 38–40
Bible: African American approach to, 12–13, 86–87; black/beautiful translations, 20, 103; and black cultural formation, 13–14; black “proof-texting,”

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