Reading Essays: An Invitation

By G. Douglas Atkins | Go to book overview

WORKS CITED

Atkins, G. Douglas. “Art and Anger: Upon Taking Up the Pen Again—On Self(e)-Expression.” JAC 20 (2000): 414–25.

———. Estranging the Familiar: Toward a Revitalized Critical Writing. Athens: U of Georgia P, 1992.

———“Going against the Grain: Deconstruction and the Scriblerians.” The Scriblerian 17 (1985): 113–17.

———. “In Other Words: Gardening for Love—The Work of the Essayist.” Kenyon Review 13 (1991): 56–69 (rpt. Estranging the Familiar).

———. “On Writing Well: or, Springing the Genie from the Inkpot—A Modest Proposal.” JAC 20 (2000): 73–86.

———. “Poetic Strategies in An Essay on Criticism, Lines 200–559.” South Atlantic Bulletin 44 (1979): 43–47.

———. Tracing the Essay: Through Experience to Meaning. Athens: U of Georgia P, 2005.

Bacon, Francis. Francis Bacon, ed. Brian Vickers. Oxford Authors. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1996.

Baldwin, James. The Fire Next Time. New York: Dial, 1963.

———. Notes of a Native Son. 1955. Boston: Beacon, 1985.

Belloc, Hilaire. Hills and the Sea. 1906. Marlboro VT: Marlboro P, n.d.

———. On Nothing and Kindred Subjects. London: Methuen, 1908.

Berry, Wendell. The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays, ed. Norman Wirzba. Washington DC: Counterpoint, 2002.

Bloom, Harold. Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human. New York: Riverhead, 1998.

Browning, Robert. “Fra Lippo Lippi.” Norton Anthology of English Literature II, 6th ed., ed. M. H. Abrams et al. New York: Norton, 1993.

Carson, Anne. Interview, by Mary Gannon. Poets &Writers Magazine 29 (March–April 2001): 26–33.

Chesterton, G. K. “A Piece of Chalk.” In Lopate.

Cowley, Abraham. “Of Solitude.” Essays. London: Cassell and Co., 1901.

Davie, Donald. These the Companions. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1982.

Davis, Walter A. The Act of Interpretation: A Critique of Literary Reason. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1978.

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reading Essays: An Invitation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 276

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.